intelligence quotient

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intelligence

 [in-tel´ĭ-jens]
the ability to comprehend or understand. It is basically a combination of reasoning, memory, imagination, and judgment; each of these faculties relies upon the others. Intelligence is not an entity within a person but a combination of cognitive skills and knowledge made evident by behaviors that are adaptive.

In speaking of general intelligence, authorities often distinguish between a number of different kinds of basic mental ability. One of these is verbal aptitude, the ability to understand the meaning of words and to use them effectively in writing or speaking. Another is skill with numbers, the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide and to use these skills in problems. The capacity to work with spatial relationships, that is, with visualizing how objects take up space, is still another (for example, how two triangles can fit together to make a square). Perception, memory, and reasoning may also be considered different basic abilities.

These abilities are the ones that are usually examined by intelligence tests. There are others, however, that may be as important or more important. Determination and perseverance make intelligence effective and useful. Artistic talent, such as proficiency in art or music, and creativity, the ability to use thought and imagination to produce original ideas, are difficult to measure but are certainly part of intelligence.
intelligence quotient (I.Q.) a numerical expression of intellectual capacity obtained by multiplying the mental age of the subject, ascertained by testing, by 100 and dividing by his or her chronologic age.
intelligence test a set of problems or tasks posed to assess an individual's innate ability to judge, comprehend, and reason.

quotient

 [kwo´shent]
a number obtained by division.
achievement quotient the achievement age divided by the mental age, indicating progress in learning.
caloric quotient the heat evolved (in calories) divided by the oxygen consumed (in milligrams) in a metabolic process.
intelligence quotient IQ; a numerical expression of intellectual capacity obtained by multiplying the mental age of the subject, ascertained by testing, by 100 and dividing by the chronological age.
respiratory quotient RQ; the ratio of the volume of carbon dioxide given off by the body tissues to the volume of oxygen absorbed by them; usually equal to the corresponding volumes given off and taken up by the lungs. It varies with the fuel source used: for carbohydrates it is 1.0; for lipids 0.7; for proteins 0.8; and with overfeeding (lipogenesis) 1.0–1.3.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tel·li·gence quo·tient (IQ),

the psychologist's index of measured intelligence as one part of a two-part determination of intelligence, the other part being an index of adaptive behavior that includes such criteria as school grades or work performance. IQ is a score, or similar quantitative index, used to denote a person's standing relative to age peers on a test of general ability, ordinarily expressed as a ratio between the person's score on a given test and the score that an average person of comparable age attained on the same test, the ratio being computed by the psychologist or determined from a table of age norms, such as the various Wechsler intelligence scales.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intelligence quotient

n. Abbr. IQ
1. A number seen as a measure of a person's intelligence, usually representing the person's score on an intelligence test as expressed in relation to the scores of others who have taken the same test, with the average score set at 100.
2. The ratio of tested mental age to chronological age, usually expressed as a quotient multiplied by 100. No longer in scientific use.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

intelligence quotient

 A ratio that compares a person's cognitive skills with that of the general population, usually calculated as the mental age divided by the chronologic age, multipled by 100
Intelligence Quotient Tests
Preschool Bayley Scale of Infant development, Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children
School age Wechsler scales, Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children
Adult Wechsler scales, Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale
Adult  20-35  Severe mental retardation
  36-51 Moderate mental retardation
  52-67 Mild mental retardation
  68-83 Borderline mental retardation
  90-110 Average
  >140 Gifted–'genius' 
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·tel·li·gence quo·tient

(IQ) (in-tel'i-jĕns kwō'shĕnt)
The psychologist's index of intelligence as one part of a two-part determination, the other part being an index of adaptive behavior. IQ is ordinarily expressed as a ratio between the person's score on a given test and the score that the average individual of comparable age attained on the same test.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

intelligence quotient (IQ)

A figure obtained by dividing the mental age, as assessed by various tests such as the Stanford-Binet test, by the chronological age, and multiplying the result by 100. Versions of the Stanford-Binet test include sections for every age level, from 2 to 20. These tests involve such activities as making copies of simple pictures, putting shapes in appropriate holes, stringing beads, answering questions, identifying absurdities in pictures, selecting words that have something in common, pairing off abstract shapes, predicting future terms in an arithmetical or graphical series, and so on. The IQ increases with age up to about 18 and then remains fairly static during most of adult life. People of IQ over 130 are exceptionally intelligent, and people below 70 are retarded in their ability to learn.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

in·tel·li·gence quo·tient

(IQ) (in-tel'i-jĕns kwō'shĕnt)
Psychologist's index of measured intelligence as one part of a two-part determination of intelligence, the other part being an index of adaptive behavior that includes such criteria as school grades or work performance.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* IN THE TUG-OF-WAR BETWEEN IQ AND EQ, the readily recognizable IQ (intelligent quotient) is being challenged by the lesser known EQ (emotional quotient) as the better basis for success.
(6) These impressionable traits include youthfulness, a low or borderline intelligent quotient (IQ), mental handicap, psychological inadequacy, recent bereavement, language barrier, alcohol or other drug withdrawal, illiteracy, fatigue, social isolation, or inexperience with the criminal justice system.
The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology decided to allow various types of tests, including interviews and behavior observation, as it is becoming difficult to measure intelligent quotient (IQ) by conventional written tests, the officials said.
Nnaji, who is a Professor of Robotic Engineering and Physics, said that a typical Nigerian child has high intelligent quotient but the process of impacting the knowledge had been a problem over the years.
He explained that though SCID could be a severe disorder, many affected children could still live normal life and have normal intelligent quotient citing example of a child afflicted by the syndrome, who is currently an undergraduate Medical students in the US.
The resurgence of primitive instincts in man in modern times, and at quite an alarming rate too, gives one the feeling that the 'intelligent quotient' that we are blessed with, and which sets apart us from other living creatures of the universe can, in a moment of unbridled frenzy, be clouded by a sudden loss of this sense of reasoning.

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