integrative therapy

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integrative therapy

Alternative psychotherapy
A type of psychotherapy combining psychosynthesis and Jungian psychoanalysis.
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Supervision Essentials for Integrative Psychotherapy
Sanders (2013) has written extensively on the integration of professional ethics and faith, while McMinn and Campbell (2007), as well as others (Jones & But-man, 1991; Norcross & Goldfried, 2005; Richards and Bergin, 2005; Sperry and Shafranske, 2005), have provided us with models for integrative psychotherapy. In addition to integrative therapeutic models, psychologists of faith are uniquely equipped to engage Christian clients in the broader exploration of who the client is in Christ, and how in light of this the client makes meaning of their psychological symptoms and capacity for change.
UK psychotherapists in private practice from different orientations -- one a family therapist with a systems-based approach, the other trained in humanistic and integrative psychotherapy -- address questions about communicating when different therapeutic languages are used, developing a holistic model, and creating connectedness with clients and colleagues.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptomatic Treatment versus Integrative Psychotherapy. Contemporary Hypnosis, Vol 24(4), 161-177.
Finlay (psychology, Open U., the UK) and Evans (gestalt and integrative psychotherapy, European Institute for Psychotherapeutic Studies, France) provide a guide for psychotherapists and counselors to conducting relational-centered qualitative research in clinical practice.
Fernando Garzon, Everett Worthington, S-Y Tan, and Kirby Worthington provide the reader with an overview of lay approaches in Christian counseling and how these approaches might impact the expectations of clients now seeking integrative psychotherapy from a Christian psychologist.
Frank (1997) proposed a brief therapy method designed for use in managed care settings that he called "focused integrative psychotherapy," which is based on psychodynamic principles and combines brief psychodynamic therapy methods with some cognitive-behavioral techniques.
Wright presented ideas for modifying therapy that he developed from his own experience as a cognitive therapist, as well as suggestions from colleagues who primarily practice psychodynamic, interpersonal, and integrative psychotherapy While transference must be deemphasized in this context, other common factors that promote the therapeutic relationship--empathy, understanding, interpersonal effectiveness, and support-- deserve close attention.
Integrative Psychotherapy: A Feedback-Driven Dynamic Systems Approach
Worthington also suggested that the "frame" of an integrative psychotherapy model is determined by the goals and methods of psychotherapy.

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