integrase inhibitor

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integrase inhibitor

Any agent that prevents the human immunodeficiency virus from inserting its viral DNA into host cell chromosomes.
See also: inhibitor
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Integrase inhibitors block HIV replication by preventing the viral DNA from integrating into the genetic material of human immune cells (T-cells).
The HIV drug TDF can be replaced by a similar but safer drug, and the integrase inhibitors are seeing more use in many places.
One option is to switch patients to integrase inhibitors, but findings from a 2017 study suggested that this may also lead to more weight gain, Dr.
Various studies have shown that, if one of a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or protease inhibitors (PI) or integrase inhibitors (INI) is combined with two potent nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), the treatment is found effective in naive cases [5].
Wit et al., "Integrase inhibitors are an independent risk factor for IRIS: an athena cohort study," in Proceedings of the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, pp.
The preferred regimens for starting treatment in the major international treatment guidelines have gradually moved towards an NRTI backbone of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/ emtricitabine (TDF/FTC), tenofovir alafenamide/FTC (TAF/FTC) or abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) plus either the protease inhibitor (PI) darunavir (DRV) boosted by either ritonavir (r) or cobicistat (c), or the integrase inhibitors raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (ELV) or dolutegravir (DTG) or the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors rilpivirine (RPV) or efavirenz (EFV)--see EACS Guidelines.
Lack of resistance to integrase inhibitors among antiretroviral-naive subjects with primary HIV-1 infection, 2007-13.
Besides nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors are now also available in the private sector, but access is limited to specific research and clinical scenarios in public facilities.
This has led to the development of integrase inhibitors, a new class of efficient antiretroviral drugs.
The once-daily drug, which belongs to a novel class known as integrase inhibitors that block the virus causing AIDS from entering cells, is owned by ViiV Healthcare, a joint venture that is focused on HIV and in which GSK is the largest shareholder.
* Integrase inhibitors that for many people have been remarkably effective in taming this devastating disease.