discrimination

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discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Trends in Mean Change Scores across Courses Number of Number of courses with courses with negative change positive change (students become (students become less aware/more Number of courses more aware/less blind) Range with no change blind) Range Unawareness of 3 1 9 Racial Privilege -.14 to -.26 .06 to .58 Unawareness of 3 0 10 Blatant Racial Issues -.01 to -.17 .10 to .35 Unawareness of 5 0 8 Institutional Discrimination -.02 to -.17 .04 to .49 Overall 2 0 11 Colorblindness -.02 to -.11 .04 to .33 Table 2 Mean Level of Colorblindness by Time and Service Participation Engaged in Service for Course Mean S.D.
In many countries, institutional discrimination as embodied in laws and statutes has affected the health of marginalized populations by restricting their access to socio-economic opportunities and resources.
If institutional discrimination tends to be unconsciously perpetrated, how do we ascertain its existence?
The 2-week test-retest reliability estimate for the Racial Privilege and Institutional Discrimination subscales was .80 for both.
As an immigrant woman, I too have confronted many of the forms of institutional discrimination the authors speak of.
For a person living with HIV, institutional discrimination also can be harrowing, as they may be denied housing, employment, or insurance.
But racism, sexism, and ethnic biases are still alive and well, and in my position I have seen (more than once) what I believe was institutional discrimination. Yet, I have felt like someone who is of value partially because of her background, but also as someone who should strive to keep that background in check.
As someone who has studied "institutional discrimination" for 15 years, it is clear that racing exhibits all the signs that corruption is endemic throughout the sport.
'The decision today confirms that the RCN collectively is committed to tackling institutional discrimination in all its forms and Pat has demonstrated that today.'
Bayor touches on Human Capital assumptions in his examination of education and labour market outcomes, and concludes that race and institutional discrimination explain the persistence of conditions which reinforce unequal outcomes.
That is why it is important institutional discrimination - whether it is a failure to provide suitable education or a seat on a flight - is challenged at every opportunity.
It is not a policy prescription, nor a quantitative study of the problem of sex discrimination in the trades, but it stands on its own as a tribute to women who have broken into the trades over the barriers of institutional discrimination, individual bias, and daunting personal challenges.

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