discrimination

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discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
Institutional discrimination causes differential access to goods, services, and benefits in society.
A third method to identify institutional discrimination is the use of discrimination-testing studies, such as those using experimental manipulation or content analysis (Farley, 2005; McMahon & Allen-Meares, 1992; Tompkins, Larkin, & Rosen, 2006; Tsang, 2001).
05), the pretest Unawareness of Institutional Discrimination subscale (t(107)=2.
It ignores the fact that there are young women who, no matter how hard they work, will never achieve what they want because of the institutional discrimination they will come up against.
Using generalized, ambiguous terminology that offered little by way of compelling Israel to end its ongoing occupation in Jerusalem and the West Bank, genocide and siege in Gaza and protracted institutional discrimination against Arabs and other minorities in Israel, she argued for "cultural engagement," instead.
This institutional discrimination contributes to a cycle of poverty, depriving many of jobs.
Benjamin Brenkert left the Society of Jesus after more than a decade, in part because of the institutional discrimination against LGBT people.
After the destruction and the non-reclamation of these lands, after the expulsion of the Innu people and the expropriation of their territory, after the institutional discrimination against Innu workers, after over four years of failed attempts at achieving reconciliation and reparation: IOC/Rio Tinto must pay its rent.
Until the Myanmar government addresses the institutional discrimination against the Rohingya population, including equal access to citizenship, this precarious migration will continue," Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said in a statement.
Enormous sentences for Albanians in case "Monster," high sentences for demonstrators, burning Albanian property, beating of Albanians and daily institutional discrimination, have become a routine for the government that BDI is part of.
The days of legal segregation and institutional discrimination may have been over in the US, but the racial divide has still not been bridged completely.
A history of institutional discrimination had seen male nurses ending up in particular nursing specialities, eg mental health, where there was no body work, or the highly technical areas of intensive and emergency care.

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