outsourcing

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outsourcing

A method in which services usually provided by the health care agency are now allocated to another firm or agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
But don't look for Catholic insourcing to make it to the presidential debates.
In order to develop an in-depth understanding of IT insourcing decisions and outcomes, we adopted a multiple case study approach.
Insourcing and outsourcing each have their advantages and disadvantages in any given situation, and total reliance on either of these is generally a poor choice.
While outsourcing of laboratory services in the biopharmaceutical and pharmaceutical industries is a long-established resource strategy, insourcing has grown exponentially as a phenomenon during the past 15 years.
In the context of the qualitative insourcing analysis, the goal is to insource legal work that has a moderate-to-high risk/value profile.
Whether insourcing will continue at the current pace is hard to forecast because there are no specific "quotas" that have to be met government-wide.
But he insisted the administration is not pushing insourcing in all areas: "We don't want there to be undue pressure one way or the other.
Although section 736 does not specify a role for OMB in the development and implementation of the civilian agency insourcing guidelines, OMB has initiated a number of efforts in response to the President's March 2009 memorandum on government contracting and section 736.
Two application properties - the application's uniqueness and its strategic role - are commonly cited as favoring insourcing [8].
WHEN CONSIDERING WHETHER TO involve a strategic resourcing partner, sponsors often encounter a vast landscape of outsourcing and insourcing support options.
Initiatives put in place by the Obama administration and Congress call for insourcing some service contracts; greater reliance on strategic sourcing and pressure for discount pricing; tougher oversight of contractors; and scaling back the use of so-called "high risk" contracts, such as noncompetitive and cost reimbursement awards.