solubility

(redirected from Insoluable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

solubility

 [sol″u-bil´ĭ-te]
the quality of being soluble.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sol·u·bil·i·ty

(sol'yū-bil'i-tē), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation soluability.
The property of being soluble.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sol·u·bil·i·ty

(solyū-bili-tē)
The property of being soluble.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

solubility

the amount of a substance that will dissolve in a given amount of another substance.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sol·u·bil·i·ty

(solyū-bili-tē)
The property of being soluble.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The product is supported with a strong, consistent print campaign focusing on informing consumers about the benefits of an insoluable fiber.
However former Brain of Britain Crampsey, after a lifetime studying football, its politics and intrigues, says that the roots of the problem are deep-seated and perhaps insoluable.
Again, this is something that deserves to be considered in another article, but for the time being it is important to recognize that the problem of the "unobservable observer" is an apparently insoluable one and that as a consequence lawmakers and the public need consider how much privacy we are willing to surrender for the sake of crime prevention or public safety.
From the vastly popular X-Files with its "The Truth Is Out There" motto and Agent Mulder's office wall poster reading "I Want to Believe," to last summer's more lighthearted box office hit Men in Black or the youth-market film Spawn, with its graphic and medieval Hell (evil always films better than its opposite, and bad guys get to chew the scenery, which is why angels do better in books than on screen), there seems to be a pervasive longing to be part of something bigger than the merely mundane, seemingly insoluable and often sordid problems of either Cops or the 6 o'clock news.