insertion

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insertion

 [in-ser´shun]
1. the act of implanting, or condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.
3. in genetics, a rare nonreciprocal type of translocation in which a segment is removed from one chromosome and then inserted into a broken region of a nonhomologous chromosome.
airway insertion and stabilization in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion or assisting with insertion and stabilization of an artificial airway. See also artificial airway management.
intravenous (IV) insertion in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion of a needle into a peripheral vein for the purpose of intravenous infusion of fluids, blood, or medications.
thought insertion the delusion that thoughts that are not one's own are being inserted into one's mind.
velamentous insertion attachment of the umbilical cord to the edge of the placenta.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn),
1. A putting in.
2. The usually more distal attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
3. In dentistry, the intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
4. Intrusion of fragments of any size from molecular to cytogenetic into the normal genome.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion

/in·ser·tion/ (-ser´shun)
1. the act of implanting, or the condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.
3. in genetics, a rare nonreciprocal type of translocation in which a segment is removed from one chromosome and then inserted into a broken region of a nonhomologous chromosome.

velamentous insertion  attachment of the umbilical cord to the membranes rather than to the placenta.

insertion

(ĭn-sûr′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of inserting.
2. Anatomy The point or mode of attachment of a skeletal muscle to the bone or other body part that it moves.
3. Genetics The addition, as by mutation, of one or more nucleotides to a chromosome.

in·ser′tion·al adj.

insertion

[insur′shən]
Etymology: L, inserere, to introduce
(in anatomy) the place of attachment, such as that of a muscle to the bone it moves.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn)
1. A putting in.
2. The attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
3. dentistry The intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
4. Intrusion of fragments of any size from molecular to cytogenetic into the normal genome.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion

  1. a point of attachment of an organ such as a leaf or muscle.
  2. the point of application of force by a muscle.

insertion

with reference to a skeletal muscle, the site of its attachment to bone which during its contraction is relatively mobile, compared to the site of its origin. For example, in elbow flexion contraction of the biceps moves the forearm (site of insertion) rather than the scapula (site of origin above the shoulder joint).
insertion both insert into lateral head of flexor hallucis muscle
insertion into the linear aspera, medial supracondylar line and adductor tubercle of the femur
insertion into posterior femur, from gluteal tuberosity to adductor tubercle; insertion is perforated (the adductor opening) allowing passage of femoral vessels

insertion

muscle attachment, i.e. to free segment of joint lever arm (see origin)

insertion (in·sirˑ·shn),

n the tendinous attachment of a muscle to the bone on which the muscle operates (i.e., the bone moves when the muscle contracts).

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, the intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
2. The usually more distal attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion (insur´shən),

n the act of implanting or placing materials or introducing the needle into the tissues.
insertion, path of,
n the direction in which a prosthesis is inserted and removed.

insertion

1. the act of implanting, or condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.

insertion sequence (IS)
see transposable genetic elements.
velamentous insertion
attachment to a membrane, such as the umbilical cord to the fetal membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Puri et al (5) found that MAP rose significantly following the insertions of both devices and that MAP rose significantly more after SLIPA insertion than after conventional LMA insertion (P <0.
The program must be designed to weather delayed insertions without catastrophic failure (rejection by the user community).
Genome sequences of chicken (low pathogenic avian influenza [LPAI] and highly pathogenic avian influenza [HPAI]) and human isolates from a 2004 outbreak of H7N3 avian influenza in Canada showed a novel insertion in the HA0 cleavage site of the human and HPAI isolate.
With Desvio para o Vermelbo (Red shift), 1967- 84, the link to the Insertions is more explicit.
Advertisers simply define their targeting parameters in advance and the system then executes a targeting decision at the time of insertion based on the set-top ID of the subscriber requesting an on-demand asset.
First, the investigator who performed all airway insertions was experienced in LMA[TM] use, though had not performed any insertion of SLIPA[TM] prior to this study.
To make the grease "slippery" enough to satisfy insertion force standards from the U.
Operator Upgrades to C-COR in San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Launch DPI, Digital, and Analog Ad Insertion Channels on the Same Platform
Concurrent Computer Corporation (NASDAQ: CCUR), a worldwide leader of on-demand technology that is shaping the future of television, today announced its patent pending solution for enabling the insertion of advertisements into on-demand "trick files" (the files that enable fast-forward and rewind).
US 6,701,507, "Method for determining a zero-skew buffer insertion point" computes a position for a zero-skew driver insertion point in an area occupied by nodes driven by the driver.
which is expanding into three divisions; local ad sales and ad insertion turnkey provider, cable network representation firm, and media buying and management services," noted Michael Wilson.
Other elastomer sockets typically break down after 100 to 2,000 insertions, but the new sockets from DCI give customers an average of 50,000 to 200,000 insertions -- much more value for their budgets.