insectivore

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Related to Insectivores: Insectivora

insectivore

(ĭn-sĕk′tĭ-vor)
A member of the order Insectivora.

insectivore

any member of the insect-eating mammalian order Insectivora, a group containing shrews, moles and hedgehogs in the British fauna.
References in periodicals archive ?
Four species of insectivore bats were recorded, with relative abundance of 5.
Although we did not measure availability of food, the limited number of insectivores in tamarisk in our study may indicate lower habitat-quality and less food resources, balanced by reduced competition.
I examined prey use by the benthic insectivore orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in a midwestern (USA) riffle-pool stream.
They are insectivores, but eat a variety of items in the wild such as frogs and toads, nestlings of ground-dwelling birds, and eggs.
We observed a dramatic shift from populations dominated by omnivores/herbivores to populations dominated by insectivores in sites progressively more downstream.
The feeding category assigned to each species was determined according to the food most often eaten and literature data: insectivores, frugivores, nectarivores, carnivores, granivores, omnivores, granivore-insectivores (mixed diet with a higher proportion of seed), insectivore-frugivores (mixed diet with a higher proportion of insects), granivore-insectivore-frugivores (mixed diet), carnivore-insectivore-frugivores (mixed diet) and carnivore-insectivores(mixed diet with a higher proportion of small vertebrates).
Additionally, 90% (n = 15) of all animal consumers are insectivores (Table 2), reflecting the strong relationship between prey size and mandible size in insectivores (Hespenheide 1971).
In 19,925 trap-nights, we captured 1295 individuals of 11 species of rodents and insectivores at 18 wetland sites (Table I).
These often-abundant insectivores might be expected to have large effects on the food web under certain circumstances.
Foraging sites were significant only because aerial insectivores had lower fecundity than other groups (see Table 5); all other groups did not differ from each other (P [greater than] 0.
carnivores, frugivores, hematophagous, insectivores and nectarivores (Gardner, 1977; Kalko et al.