venom

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Related to Insect venom: Bee venom

venom

 [ven´om]
poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.
Russell's viper venom the venom of Vipera russelli (Russell's viper), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of coagulation factor X.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm),
A poisonous fluid secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, etc.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

/ven·om/ (ven´om) a poison, especially one normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.

venom

(vĕn′əm)
n.
A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.

venom

[ven′əm]
Etymology: L, venenum, poison
a toxic fluid substance secreted by some snakes, arthropods, and other animals and transmitted by their stings or bites.

venom

Toxicology A poisonous substance produced by an insect or animal, stored in specific sacs and sundry sites, and released by biting or stinging; venoms, the original biological weapons, are used for defense and to capture prey. See Snake venom, Yellow jacket venom.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm)
A toxin secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, and other cold-blooded animals.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

Poison produced by scorpions, some jellyfish, some fish, a few snakes, some toads, the Gila monster, some spiders and a few insects such as bees, wasps or hornets. Venoms act in various ways and may affect either the nervous system, to cause paralysis, or the blood to cause either widespread clotting or bleeding. Venoms are seldom fatal except in very young or debilitated people.

Venom

A poisonous substance secreted by an animal, usually delivered through a bite or a sting.

venom

poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect or other animal.

Russell's viper venom
the venom of the Russell viper (Vipera russelli), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of clotting factor X. See also russell's viper venom.
References in periodicals archive ?
Individuals suspected of having IgE-mediated allergy to aeroallergens and/or insect venoms were recruited prospectively from July 2001 to December 2001 from all those presenting to the Allergy Unit of the Department of Dermatology and Allergy of the Technical University of Munich.
Depending on the type of allergy suspected, samples were tested by the 2 in vitro sIgE assays either for 7 aeroallergens (3 indoor and 4 outdoor aeroallergens) or 2 insect venoms (Table 2 of the online Data Supplement).
This is especially important during the insect season and during the course of insect venom immunotherapy, and in particular, is useful in case you are alone and stung and you develop severe, sudden shock-like (anaphylactic) symptoms.
Insect venoms are available for the treatment of allergies to honey bee, yellow jacket, hornet and wasp.
Patients with allergies to insect stings are now being "desensitized" with progressively concentrated solutions of venom; these injections are designed to cause the body to manufacture a "protective" antibody of the IgG class, which snags insect venom before it is seen by the hysterical IgE patrol squad.
Annually, more people die as a result of insect venom than they do from snake venom, and while some of these victims succumb to the toxic effects of multiple stings, many fatalities are the results of allergic reaction to one or two stings.
Again, while such edema may simply be a local reaction to insect venom, then is the possibility that it signifies cellulitis (infection of the skin), especially if the area becomes very warm and red.
The child can be desensitized to insect venom and kept on a maintenance dose that will protect him against normal future encounters with Hymenoptera.
Again, while such edema may simply be a local reaction to insect venom, there is the possibility that it signifies cellulitis (infection of the skin), especially if the area becomes very warm and red.
Some allergens are more commonly associated with anaphylaxis than others--for example, certain insect venoms and drugs such as penicillin and, among foods, fish, peanuts, nuts, eggs and seeds.
This procedure, known as immunotherapy, has been successful in reducing allergy to pollens or insect venoms, but it does not work in all such cases.
com/research/5fa09b/encyclopedia_of_cl) has announced the addition of Informa Healthcare's "Encyclopedia of Clinical Toxicology: A Comprehensive Guide to the Toxicology of Prescription and OTC Drugs, Chemical, Herbals, Plants, Fungi, Marine Life, Reptile and Insect Venoms, Food Ingredients, Clothing and Environmental Toxins" book to their extensive offering of medical research publications.