venom

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Related to Insect venom: Bee venom

venom

 [ven´om]
poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.
Russell's viper venom the venom of Vipera russelli (Russell's viper), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of coagulation factor X.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm),
A poisonous fluid secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, etc.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

/ven·om/ (ven´om) a poison, especially one normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.

venom

(vĕn′əm)
n.
A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.

venom

[ven′əm]
Etymology: L, venenum, poison
a toxic fluid substance secreted by some snakes, arthropods, and other animals and transmitted by their stings or bites.

venom

Toxicology A poisonous substance produced by an insect or animal, stored in specific sacs and sundry sites, and released by biting or stinging; venoms, the original biological weapons, are used for defense and to capture prey. See Snake venom, Yellow jacket venom.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm)
A toxin secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, and other cold-blooded animals.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

Poison produced by scorpions, some jellyfish, some fish, a few snakes, some toads, the Gila monster, some spiders and a few insects such as bees, wasps or hornets. Venoms act in various ways and may affect either the nervous system, to cause paralysis, or the blood to cause either widespread clotting or bleeding. Venoms are seldom fatal except in very young or debilitated people.

Venom

A poisonous substance secreted by an animal, usually delivered through a bite or a sting.

venom

poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect or other animal.

Russell's viper venom
the venom of the Russell viper (Vipera russelli), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of clotting factor X. See also russell's viper venom.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main goal of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of sIgE values obtained by IML to objective, well-established in vivo and laboratory methods for identifying sensitization to a representative spectrum of specific aeroallergens and insect venom allergens for patients typical of those encountered by our laboratory on a daily basis.
Large skin-test studies with insect venom suggest that 15 percent of the population may be predisposed.
The tenderizer contained papain, an enzyme that breaks down protein and has long been considered to be an anti-inflammatory effective against the pain-producing proteins in insect venom.
The epinephrine market is segmented into four different types of allergies, the most common being food and insect venom.
He said the different types of substances producing allergy are pollen grains of flowers, dust particles, house dust mite, outdoor and indoor molds or fungus, insect venom of bee, animal dander like sloughed off skin, saliva and excreta of dog or cat secretions and excretions of birds, body parts and excreta of insects like cockroach, foods like milk, egg, fish, prawns, beef, mutton, chicken, peanuts, and some drugs like penicillin, sulfa drugs and insulin.
Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening, whole body allergic reaction typically caused by food allergens, drugs or insect venom.
Insect venom allergies are caused by an excessive immune response, usually to a wasp or bee sting.
Allergens that trigger seasonal allergies are often common, usually harmless substances such as pollen, mold spores, animal dander, dust, foods, insect venoms and medications.
com/research/5fa09b/encyclopedia_of_cl) has announced the addition of Informa Healthcare's "Encyclopedia of Clinical Toxicology: A Comprehensive Guide to the Toxicology of Prescription and OTC Drugs, Chemical, Herbals, Plants, Fungi, Marine Life, Reptile and Insect Venoms, Food Ingredients, Clothing and Environmental Toxins" book to their extensive offering of medical research publications.