sting

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Related to Insect sting: bee sting, Spider bite

sting

 [sting]
1. injury caused by a poisonous substance produced by an animal or plant (biotoxin) and introduced into or onto an individual, together with mechanical trauma incident to such introduction.
2. the organ used to inflict such injury.
bee sting see bee sting.
insect sting see insect bites and stings.

sting

(sting),
1. Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by the puncture of the skin by many species of arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of venomous fish, such as the stingray, toadfish, rabbitfish, and catfish.
2. The venom apparatus of a stinging animal, consisting of a chitinous spicule or bony spine and a venom gland or sac.
3. To introduce (or the process of introducing) a venom by stinging.
[O.E. stingan]

sting

(sting)
1. injury due to a biotoxin introduced into an individual or with which he comes in contact, together with the mechanical trauma incident to its introduction.
2. the organ used to inflict such injury.

sting

(stĭng)
v. stung (stŭng), stinging, stings
v.tr.
1. To pierce or wound painfully with a sharp-pointed structure or organ, as that of certain insects.
2. To cause to feel a sharp, smarting pain: smoke stinging our eyes.
v.intr.
1. To have, use, or wound with a sharp-pointed structure or organ: Do all bees sting?
2. To cause a sharp, smarting pain: The needle will sting a little.
n.
1. The act of stinging.
2. The wound or pain caused by stinging.
3. A sharp, piercing organ or part, often ejecting a venomous secretion, as the modified ovipositor of a bee or wasp or the spine of certain fishes.

sting′ing·ly adv.

sting

Etymology: AS, stingan
an injury caused by a sharp, painful penetration of the skin, often accompanied by exposure to an irritating chemical or the venom of an insect or other animal. In cases of hypersensitivity, a highly venomous sting, or multiple stings, anaphylactic shock may occur. Kinds of stings include bee, jellyfish, scorpion, sea urchin, and shellfish stings. See also stingray, wasp.

sting

Medtalk The injury caused by an injected venom from a plant or animal. See Hymenopteran sting, Scorpion sting, Wasp sting.

sting

(sting)
1. Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by puncture of the skin by many species of arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of venomous fish, such as the stingray, toadfish, rabbitfish, and catfish.
See also: bites
2. The venom apparatus of a stinging animal, consisting of a chitinous spicule or bony spine and a venom gland or sac.
3. To introduce (or the process of introducing) a venom by stinging.

sting

an organ present in many different animal groups that is capable of injecting a poison into other organisms as either a defensive or an offensive mechanism. Examples include the modified ovipositor in HYMENOPTERA, cnidoblasts in coelenterata, the tail in scorpion.

sting

(sting)
Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by puncture of the skin by arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of venomous fish, such as the stingray, toadfish, rabbitfish, and catfish.

sting,

n an injury caused by a sharp, painful penetration of the skin, often accompanied by exposure to an irritating chemical or the venom of an insect or other animal. Can also be considered a prick.

sting

1. injury caused by a poisonous substance produced by an animal or plant (biotoxin) and introduced into a patient which it contacts, together with mechanical trauma incident to its introduction. See also insect bites and stings.
2. the organ used to inflict such injury.
3. the illicit prerace administration of a stimulant to a horse with the object of improving its performance.

Patient discussion about sting

Q. How to treat a bee sting? We went on a picnic today and my son was stung by a bee. How to treat it?

A. if your son is allergic to bees venom- you need to inject epinephrine very fast and take him to the nearest hospital. but if his not allergic- nothing. if the bee left it's sting try removing it with flicking motion of the fingers, not by grabbing it- this will inject any venom that didn't enter right inside. and calm the kid down and tell him it's not the end of the world. the bee probably though he is a flower and tasted like nectar.

Q. Does a bee allergy always lead to a state of life risk when being stinged? And how is it possible to avoid bees when allergic?

A. Thanks bianca!! I hate bees and actually really afraid to get stinged...

Q. what do i do first if i got stung by a bee? and i am allergic ... :)

A. People who are known to be severely allergic to bee sting usually carry on themselves an adrenaline injection (called epipen etc.), which should be given in order to prevent serious complications of the allergic reaction (like blockage of air flow to the lungs and shock), and then seek medical attention.

However, these measures are prescribed by a doctor, so if you have any questions regarding this subject, you should consult one (e.g. immunologist).

You may read more here:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/anaphylaxis/DS00009

More discussions about sting
References in periodicals archive ?
Has a reaction possibly due to insect stings, for accurate identification of the specific allergen and consideration for immunotherapy (allergy shots).
The findings from the insect sting study were similar.
This venom immunotherapy is given in gradually stronger doses to stimulate the patient's immune system to become more and more resistant to the insect sting.
After 2 decades of experience with venom immunotherapy, physicians are still unsure which patients who react to insect stings should receive the treatment and for how long.
This condition commonly is triggered by insect stings (especially those of bees, hornets and wasps); foods (including milk, eggs, nuts, and shellfish); and widely used drugs (such as penicillin, seizure medicines, muscle relaxants, and even aspirin).
There were no differences in the frequency of other symptoms, personal or family history of allergies, recent insect sting or bite, taking medications other than antibiotics, or ingestion of peanuts, nuts, shellfish, tomatoes, or strawberries.
The 36-year-old Juventus stopper, banned for the Dublin showdown, took a medicine that contained banned substance cortisone to treat an insect sting in August.
Wasp expert says it's rare to die from insect sting Wasp expert Stuart Roberts says dying after being stung by one of the insects is extremely rare.
If the swelling is related to his/her time in the garden it could be an insect sting or perhaps an `allergic' reaction to a plant.
The coroner recorded a verdict of death by natural causes-coronary and respiratory failure resulting from an insect sting.
They included a TV ad for the Crazy Frog ringtone, a Barclays Bank ad showing a man having an adverse reaction to an insect sting and an advert showing people spitting out Fanta.