insect repellent

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insect repellent

A commercial preparation effective in repelling insects. Many insect repellents contain diethyltoluamide, an effective agent popularly known as DEET.

CAUTION!

When applying insect repellent, do not allow it to contact the eyes.
See also: repellent
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Does that mean ornamental plants and herbs containing natural insect repellents are practical additions for residential settings?
Mason, OH - Medella Laboratories would like to announce that their Natural Insect repellent product beat a DEET based product in the just concluded University of Georgia research.
One reason is that sunscreen needs frequent reapplication, while insect repellent does not.
Layden recommended that adults should administer insect repellent to children, as they can have a difficult time manipulating cans and bottles, and may end up inhaling repellent or getting it in mouths or eyes, which should be avoided.
Insect repellent use in the first three months was linked with an 81% increased risk of hypospadias.
Here are some tips on the safe use of insect repellents on your kids:
CONTACTS: "Comparative Efficacy of Insect Repellents against Mosquito Bites," http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/347/1/13; National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides (NCAMP), www.beyondpesticides.org; Pesticide Action Network North America, www.panna.org.
Research into how mosquitoes smell out their human prey could help scientists develop new insect repellents to stop the spread of malaria, it was revealed yesterday.
Insect repellents are largely made up of chemicals in the form of sprays or repellent smoke.
So, you think you've found some insect repellents that work better than DEET, NSN 6840-01-284-3982.
This text for medical professionals, public health officials, and the public treats insect repellents for individual use rather than community vector control, given concerns about such insect-borne diseases as West Nile virus.
Due to a dislike of chemicalbased insect repellents, they experimented in the hope of finding something more natural that actually worked.