entomophily

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entomophily

the POLLINATION of plants by insects. Such animal pollinators are one of the two main mechanisms for the transport of pollen to the stigma, the other being ANEMOPHILY. In entomophilous flowers the colours are adapted to their pollinators, for example, moths are mainly active at dusk and at night and they visit flowers that are mostly white; bees cannot see red and will visit mainly blue or yellow flowers. Many flowers have patterns visible only with ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT which insects (but not mammals) can detect. Deep flowers are pollinated by insects with long mouthparts, and short flowers by insects with short mouthparts, an example of COEVOLUTION of plants and insects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoverflies could, therefore, be a key to biodiversity and ensuring insect pollination in the future.
There are 369,000 flowering plant species, and 90 percent of them are dependent on insect pollination.
Insect pollination alone is worth $200 billion per annum.
Many wild flowering plants also rely on insect pollination for reproduction.
It is estimated that almost 90 percent of all wild plants in the world are dependent on some sort of insect pollination. When many of us think of pollinators, we automatically think of the common European honey bee, Apis mellifera.
What we would do is eating the grey foods -- wheat, rice, potatoes -- that don't require insect pollination. The crops that require insect pollination are the colourful foods -- soft fruit, vegetables, things that provide a variety and make food interesting.
Considering that many crops grown in the country, especially those important to small-scale farmers, depend on insect pollination for good yields and quality and that these farmers are the majority in the sector, the welfare of bees is highly dependent on them.
The Cycadales is the most threatened plant order (IUCN 2017), and because it relies on insect pollination, identification of another pollinator is beneficial for conservation efforts.
Honeybees contribute nearly 80% of the total insect pollination community and therefore, are considered as the best pollinators (Robinson and Morse, 1989).
Regarding the pollination of Vitis species, several theories have been proposed, varying from insect pollination to self-pollination, depending on the cultivar (PRATT, 1971).
More than (https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2017/06/20/being-serious-about-saving-bees) one-third of all crop production nationwide requires insect pollination, according to the USDA.
Veldtman, "Valuing insect pollination services with cost of replacement," PLoS ONE, vol.