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gin·seng

(jin'seng),
The roots of several species of Panax (family Araliaceae), esteemed as of great medicinal virtue by the Chinese, used extensively as a "nutriceutical"; alleged to improve mental and physical functions.
[Ch.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ginseng

(jĭn′sĕng′)
n.
1. Any of several plants of the genus Panax, especially P. ginseng of East Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having small greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately compound leaves, and forked roots used in herbal medicine.
2. The roots or preparations of the roots of any of these plants.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Alternative medicine An herb used as a herbal remedy, as an anxiolytic and antidepressant
Chinese medicine Any of 22 different deciduous plants, mostly of the Panax family—e.g., Panax ginseng—that are native to Southeast Asia; ginseng root contains panaxin, panax acid, panaquilen, panacen, sapogenin, and ginsenin; it is used in Chinese herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative, and said to have immunologic, hormonal, and stress-reducing effects; it has been used for respiratory infections, gastrointestinal complaints including anorexia, bloating, depression, diarrhoea, vomiting, fatigue, impotence, shock, shortness of breath, stress, increased sweating
Physiologic effects Increased testosterone, corticosteroids, gluconeogenesis, central nervous system activity, increased pulse and blood pressure, gastrointestinal motility, haematopoiesis; decreased cholesterol
Toxicity Ginseng should not be used in patients with asthma, arrhythmias, hypertension, or post-menopausal bleeding
Fringe oncology Ginseng’s effect on cancer is inconclusive; weak data suggest it may have carcinoprotective effects. See Unproven methods for cancer management
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ginseng

Pharmacognosy An herb used as a herbal remedy, as an anxiolytic and antidepressant Physiologic effects ↑ testosterone, corticosteroids, gluconeogenesis, CNS activity, HTN, ↑ pulse and BP, GI motility, hematopoiesis; ↓ cholesterol Toxicity Ginseng should not be used in Pts with asthma, arrhythmias, HTN, or post-menopausal bleeding. See Unproven methods for cancer management.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gin·seng

(jin'seng)
(Panax quinquefolius) Herbal with dozens of purported therapeutic properties (e.g., antidepressant, aphrodisiac, sleep aid, systemic panacea); used worldwide by enormous numbers of people.
[Ch.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ginseng

The root of two perennial Chinese and Korean herbs of the genus Panax—P. quinquefolium or P. schinseng . Ginseng is credited with the power to cure many diseases including cancer, rheumatism and diabetes, and to have powerful aphrodisiac properties. There is no evidence that the herb has any medical or other value.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Al Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paul, al Hospital Mental de Antioquia, a la Clinica Samein, a la Clinica INSAM y al Centro de Salud Mental de Envigado.
The higher metabolic quotients in the mound zone may reflect soil disturbance and a high proportion of relatively easily metabolized soil carbon (Anderson and Domsch 1985, 1986, Insam and Domsch 1988, Insam and Haselwandter 1989).
Ros M, Pascual JA, Garcia C, Hernandez MT, Insam H (2006) Hydrolase activities, microbial biomass and bacterial community in a soil after long-term amendment with different composts.
El protocolo de investigacion fue revisado y aprobado por los comites de etica de las facultades de medicina de la Universidad de Antioquia y de la Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, de los hospitales San Vicente de Paul y Mental de Antioquia, y de las clinicas Samein, Insam y Las Americas, de Medellin, Colombia.
When expressed on a microbial C basis, C[O.sub.2]-C production (qC[O.sub.2] values) can be indicative of microbial metabolic efficiency (Insam and Haselwandter 1989; Anderson and Domsch 1990).
The ratios of [C.sub.mic] to total organic carbon ([C.sub.mic]/[C.sub.org]; Anderson and Domsch 1986) and microbial respiration to [C.sub.mic] (metabolic quotient) have been used to monitor soil microbial changes during secondary succession (Insam and Haselwandter 1989) and during recovery from severe disturbance (Insam and Domsch 1988).
qC[O.sub.2] is a sensitive indicator of differences found among cropping systems and temperature regimes (Anderson and Domsch, 1985; Insam and Haselwandter).
Heinemeyer O, Insam H, Kaiser EA, Walenzik G (1989) Soil microbial biomass and respiration measurements: an automated technique based on infra-red gas analysis.