Inuit

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Inuit

(ĭn′ū-ĭt) [Eskimo people]
People native to Arctic America.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I decided to carry on and after 14 miles we checked our position and we were 35 metres out." The expedition was to raise money for Cancer Research UK and to highlight how climate change is affecting the Innuit people whose safety and survival depend on the seasons.
We've bounced from Esquimaux to Eskimo to Husky to Innuit to Inuits to Innu, all the while having our relations with the federal government managed by a department of Indian Affairs!
CHILLING: Innuit huts sink as the Alaskan snow melts
Later discussions include Jo-Anne Fiske, "Colonization and the Decline of Women's Status: The Tsimshian Case," Feminist Studies, 17, 3 (1991), 509-35, and her "Fishing is a Woman's Business: The Changing Economic Roles of Carrier Women and Men," in Bruce Cox, ed., Native Peoples, Native Lands: Canadian Indian, Innuit and Metis (Ottawa 1988), 186-90; Ron Bougeault, "The Indians, the Metis and the Fur Trade: Class, Sexism and Racism in the Transition from Communism to Capitalism," Studies in Political Economy, 12 (1983), 45-80; John Lutz, "After the Fur Trade: the Aboriginal labouring class of British Columbia, 1849-90," Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, 3 (1992), 69-94.
It was the culmination of two decades of hard work and negotiations that gave birth to Nunavut (Innuit word for "Our Land"); arguably the most comprehensive settlement ever reached between a state and an aboriginal group anywhere in the world.
What is refreshing in papers in these sections is the effort to penetrate historical reality: the views of Innuit mapmakers, or the actual economic and political practices which could be transformed into stereotypes in service of a colonial agenda.
The Innu not to be confused with their neighbours the Innuit, were the last North American Indians to be forced to give up their traditional nomadic hunting way of life and to settle in places like Davis Inlet and Goose Bay only as recently as the 1960s and 1970s.
Matthews's examples came overwhelmingly from Greek and Latin as well as English, but Katamba ranges widely through exotic languages; Innuit and Amerindian languages as well as those of Africa and East Asia.
These, with their deep understanding of the essence of life in the North, their analysis of lessons from the traditional dwellings of the Innuit and the Lapps, their understanding of the possibilities of using ambient energy, had (and still have) a real possibility of being the basis of humanly rewarding and ecologically appropriate townships.