Inuit

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Inuit

(ĭn′ū-ĭt) [Eskimo people]
People native to Arctic America.
References in periodicals archive ?
De ellos descienden todos los Indios, que eran temidos por nuestros ancestros ya que mataban a los Innuit cada vez que podian.
CHILLING: Innuit huts sink as the Alaskan snow melts
Native Peoples, Native Lands: Canadian Indian, Innuit and Metis (Ottawa 1988), 186-90; Ron Bougeault, "The Indians, the Metis and the Fur Trade: Class, Sexism and Racism in the Transition from Communism to Capitalism," Studies in Political Economy, 12 (1983), 45-80; John Lutz, "After the Fur Trade: the Aboriginal labouring class of British Columbia, 1849-90," Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, 3 (1992), 69-94.
En este sentido las experiencias en Canada y particularmente en la provincia de Quebec, con su tratamiento a los esquimales innuit, asi como el regimen especial del que gozan los indios yaquis en nuestro pais, son ejemplos de como, sin transplantar modelos, resulta perfectamente plausible alcanzar la autonomia de los pueblos indigenas, sin mortificar en nada soberania nacional.
What is refreshing in papers in these sections is the effort to penetrate historical reality: the views of Innuit mapmakers, or the actual economic and political practices which could be transformed into stereotypes in service of a colonial agenda.
The Innu not to be confused with their neighbours the Innuit, were the last North American Indians to be forced to give up their traditional nomadic hunting way of life and to settle in places like Davis Inlet and Goose Bay only as recently as the 1960s and 1970s.
Wallis writes `Br Fragorem, seu rupturam violentam innuit, praesertim sonoram' (p.
These, with their deep understanding of the essence of life in the North, their analysis of lessons from the traditional dwellings of the Innuit and the Lapps, their understanding of the possibilities of using ambient energy, had (and still have) a real possibility of being the basis of humanly rewarding and ecologically appropriate townships.
There are nine sites in all, ranging from Baffin Island, NWT (approximately 80% Innuit population) to Oakland, California (inner-city, predominantly Hispanic and Southeast Asian).
I can accept the latter part of this argument (though it is not particularly new) but I find the assumption that the Bush-men of the Kalahari and the Innuit of the Arctic both see and judge the natural landscape in the same way and would both place Savannas at the top of their pecking orders too extreme.
For example, problems in this area are more common and more severe in the Native American and Innuit populations and less common and milder in Afro-Americans.