inoculation

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Related to Innoculation: immunization

inoculation

 [ĭ-nok″u-la´shun]
introduction of pathogenic microorganisms, injective material, serum, or other substances into tissues of living organisms or into culture media; introduction of a disease agent into a healthy individual to produce a mild form of the disease, followed by immunity.

in·oc·u·la·tion

(in-ok-yū-lā'shŭn), Avoid the misspelling innoculation.
Introduction into the body of the causative organism of a disease. Also sometimes used, incorrectly, to mean immunization with any type of vaccine.

inoculation

/in·oc·u·la·tion/ (-ok″u-la´shun) introduction of microorganisms, infective material, serum, or other substances into tissues of living organisms, or culture media; introduction of a disease agent into a healthy individual to produce a mild form of the disease followed by immunity.

inoculation

(ĭ-nŏk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
The act or an instance of inoculating, especially the introduction of an antigenic substance or vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease.

inoculation

[inok′yəlāshən]
Etymology: L, inoculare, to graft
(medical term) the introduction of a substance (inoculum) into the body to produce or to increase immunity to the disease or condition associated with the substance. It is performed by making multiple scratches in the skin after placement of a drop of the substance on the skin, by puncture of the skin with an implement bearing multiple short tines, or by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injection. Introduction can also be intranasal or oral. -inoculate, v.

in·oc·u·la·tion

(i-nok'yū-lā'shŭn)
Introduction into the body of the causative organism of a disease.

inoculation

Immunization or vaccination. The procedure by which the immune system is stimulated into producing protective antibodies (IMMUNOGLOBULINS) to specific infective agents, such as viruses and bacteria by the introduction into the body of safe forms of the organism or of its ANTIGENIC elements.

inoculation

the introduction of biological material (the inoculum) into a medium such as a living organism, synthetic substrate or soil.

in·oc·u·la·tion

(i-nok'yū-lā'shŭn)
Introduction into the body of causative organism of a disease. Also used, incorrectly, to mean immunization with a vaccine.

inoculation

introduction of pathogenic microorganisms, infective material, serum, or other substances into tissues of living organisms or into culture media; introduction of a disease agent into a healthy animal to produce a mild form of the disease, followed by immunity.

Patient discussion about inoculation

Q. Do Vaccines cause Autism? I have heard all over the news lately that the vaccines we give our children can cause Autism. Is this true? Is it dangerous? Should I vaccinate my one year old son?

A. NO

Andrew Wakefield MD started the controversy when publish the idea in Lancet. He was paid 130,000 dollars to lie

Check this link for full story:
http://www.thedoctorsvideos.com/video/749/MMR-and-Autism-The-Andrew-Wakefield-Story

Q. Who Should Receive the Flu Vaccine? Should I go get vaccinated for the flu? I have been told it is advised only for certain people, so who should receive this vaccine?

A. before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links and create your own opinion:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.

Q. Does the flu vaccine protect from all kinds of flu? If I get a flu vaccine does that mean I am completely protected from getting the flu?

A. No, the vaccine does not give complete protection from all the flu types out there. The vaccine protects from the most common types of flu, which are: H3N2, H1N1 and one B virus.

More discussions about inoculation
References in periodicals archive ?
They found that injections with saliva resulted in sores that were five to 10 times larger than those induced by parasitic organisms alone, and that the saliva-enhanced lesions had as much as 5,000 times more parasites within a month after innoculation.
This involves items such as coverslips, slides, universal containers, specimen bags, urine containers, innoculation loops, transport swabs, pipettes and pipette tips, microtubes, bijous and caps.
A Once she's finished her initial innoculation programme at about 12 weeks you need to start booking her in for 10-minute sessions at your local groomers.
Described as "potentially terrifically beneficial", innoculation would probably be given via food.
Many parents have resorted to single jabs instead of the medically recommended triple innoculation as a result of that report, and measles in children significantly increased as a result.
The danger is that their unfounded concerns will be felt by those unable to find alternative vaccinations and children will go without innoculation.
They often mentioned their own sex life and family and even showed a then 13-month-old Chloe getting innoculation jags.
But what I object to are the people who think the ECB is an innoculation jumping aboard the cricket bandwagon.
Tony Higgins is now in charge of Scotland's Players Union but was George's team-mate at Hibs on the day at Ibrox when an innoculation saw him pass a fitness test - and almost kill himself.
But he's worried that some clubs, notably Everton, have not allowed their players to receive the required innoculation programme.
7 per cent born in late 2003 had the innoculation, figures out yesterday revealed.
The Royal College of Physicians insisted the innoculation was safe, and urged parents to immunise their children against measles, mumps and rubella.