inoculation

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inoculation

 [ĭ-nok″u-la´shun]
introduction of pathogenic microorganisms, injective material, serum, or other substances into tissues of living organisms or into culture media; introduction of a disease agent into a healthy individual to produce a mild form of the disease, followed by immunity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·oc·u·la·tion

(in-ok-yū-lā'shŭn), Avoid the misspelling innoculation.
Introduction into the body of the causative organism of a disease. Also sometimes used, incorrectly, to mean immunization with any type of vaccine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inoculation

(ĭ-nŏk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
The act or an instance of inoculating, especially the introduction of an antigenic substance or vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·oc·u·la·tion

(i-nok'yū-lā'shŭn)
Introduction into the body of the causative organism of a disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inoculation

Immunization or vaccination. The procedure by which the immune system is stimulated into producing protective antibodies (IMMUNOGLOBULINS) to specific infective agents, such as viruses and bacteria by the introduction into the body of safe forms of the organism or of its ANTIGENIC elements.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

inoculation

the introduction of biological material (the inoculum) into a medium such as a living organism, synthetic substrate or soil.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·oc·u·la·tion

(i-nok'yū-lā'shŭn)
Introduction into the body of causative organism of a disease. Also used, incorrectly, to mean immunization with a vaccine.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about inoculation

Q. Do Vaccines cause Autism? I have heard all over the news lately that the vaccines we give our children can cause Autism. Is this true? Is it dangerous? Should I vaccinate my one year old son?

A. NO

Andrew Wakefield MD started the controversy when publish the idea in Lancet. He was paid 130,000 dollars to lie

Check this link for full story:
http://www.thedoctorsvideos.com/video/749/MMR-and-Autism-The-Andrew-Wakefield-Story

Q. Who Should Receive the Flu Vaccine? Should I go get vaccinated for the flu? I have been told it is advised only for certain people, so who should receive this vaccine?

A. before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links and create your own opinion:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.

Q. Does the flu vaccine protect from all kinds of flu? If I get a flu vaccine does that mean I am completely protected from getting the flu?

A. No, the vaccine does not give complete protection from all the flu types out there. The vaccine protects from the most common types of flu, which are: H3N2, H1N1 and one B virus.

More discussions about inoculation
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References in periodicals archive ?
This moralistic pedagogy (although a matter of sexual and aesthetic taste for Miss Mount and physical aversion and self-closeting for Miss Braid) fails, and, combined with the destabilizing presence of H.R.H., the subtle competition between Eugenie Plash and Regina Outre-Mer for the affection of Miss Mount, the growing conspiratorial designs of the Plash sisters, and, most important, the exposure to lesbian-themed literature (which can either infect students with or innoculate them against the poison of homophobia) leads to the infamous venom-sucking scene, in which Miss Mount comes close to losing her career by heroically saving the life of royalty.
These comments obviously failed to innoculate Arendt's public realm theory against charges of irrelevance and elitism, but they indicate that she knew that politics were not simply acts of self-revelation--splendid, courageous, and immortalizing though they may be.
Foreign Office advice for travellers to Brazil's Amazon region is for a batch of jabs to innoculate against a range of potentially deadly equatorial diseases.
This article contains strategies that should innoculate state law tort claims from preemption defenses and enable plaintiffs to get to trial or demand a higher settlement.
Shares in the group plunged from a high of 603.5p to 227.5p after it withdrew its BCG vaccine - used to innoculate school children against TB - because it had found some faulty batches.
But wildcats are not as cute as they look, as keepers at the Highland Wildlife Park discovered when they tried to innoculate the four kittens.
I try to innoculate myself against the disease of self-importance.
JAB SCARE: The MMR vaccine; DOSE: One of the MMR vaccines used to innoculate children; LOVING: Anne O'Connor with son Stephen, 11, who suffers from autism
Now the dog's vet has warned that Bliss may not be the last victim unless owners innoculate their pets against ticks before they leave the UK.