tunica intima

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tunica

 [too´nĭ-kah] (L.)
a tunic or coat; used in anatomic nomenclature to designate a membranous covering of an organ or a distinct layer of the wall of a hollow structure, as a blood vessel.
tunica adventi´tia the outer coat of various tubular structures.
tunica albugi´nea a dense white fibrous sheath that encloses a part or organ, such as the testicle or ovary.
tunica conjuncti´va the conjunctiva.
tunica dar´tos dartos.
tunica exter´na an outer coat, such as the fibroelastic coat of a blood vessel.
tunica inter´na an inner coat or layer.
tunica in´tima the innermost coat of a blood vessel; called also Bichat's tunic.
tunica me´dia the muscular middle coat of a blood vessel.
tunica muco´sa the mucous membrane lining of various tubular structures.
tunica muscula´ris the muscular coat or layer surrounding the tela submucosa in most portions of the digestive, respiratory, urinary, and genital tracts.
tunica pro´pria the proper coat or layer of a part, as distinguished from an investing membrane.
tunica sero´sa the membrane lining the external walls of the body cavities and reflected over the surfaces of protruding organs; it secretes a watery exudate.
tunica vagina´lis tes´tis the serous membrane covering the front and sides of the testis and epididymis.
tunica vasculo´sa a vascular coat, or a layer well supplied with blood vessels.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tu·ni·ca in·ti·ma

[TA]
the innermost coat of a blood or lymphatic vessel; it consists of endothelium, usually a thin fibroelastic subendothelial layer, and an inner elastic membrane or longitudinal fibers.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tu·ni·ca in·ti·ma

(tū'ni-kă in'ti-mă) [TA]
The innermost coat of a blood or lymphatic vessel; consists of endothelium, usually a thin fibroelastic subendothelial layer, and an inner elastic membrane of longitudinal fibers.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tu·ni·ca in·ti·ma

(tū'ni-kă in'ti-mă) [TA]
The innermost coat of a blood or lymphatic vessel; consists of endothelium, usually a thin fibroelastic subendothelial layer, and an inner elastic membrane of longitudinal fibers.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The inner coat of arms, with its unusual Garter Collar, and the immediate fireplace surround of black Tournai marble are additions made in the 1820s by the 10th Duke of Hamilton.
To further reduce weight, the improved ABU design will remove the inner coat liner and interior pockets.
Animal hairs are classified into three basic types: a) "primary" or "guard" hairs that form the outer coat of an animal and provide protection from sunlight, moisture; b) "secondary" hairs (also known as fur or wool hairs, or the undercoat) that form the inner coat of an animal and provide insulation; and c) tactile hairs (whiskers) that provide sensory functions.
"The position required for this to happen is face down so that the bubble floats to the top (back) of the eye, pressing the macula against the inner coat of the eye so it will reattach over the first few weeks post-operatively.
Live reptiles have been smuggled through the mail in Tupperware containers marked "Fragile Glass." A man caught by a Miami wildlife inspector with a live South American woolly monkey (street value, $10,000) in his inner coat pocket, denied the smuggling charge and said it must have "jumped" into his coat.
The pathway from the cornea, (the 'glassy' transparent part of the eyeball) through the lens to the retina (inner coat of the eye) and from there, through the optic nerve to the brain was normal.
30 The coat of a komondor consists of cords formed when the outer and inner coats cling together.
A fully dry shell mold can be re-wetted during dipping and may also cause the inner coats to absorb water, extending the total drying time required to produce the shell molds.