jones

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Jones

(jōnz),
Ernest, British psychiatrist, 1879-1958. See: Ross-Jones test.

Jones

(jōnz),
Henry Bence. See: Bence Jones.

Jones

(jōnz),
T. Duckett, U.S. cardiologist, 1899-1954. See: Jones criteria.

jones

(jōnz) Slang
n.
1. Heroin.
2. An addiction or craving.
intr.v. jonesed, jonesing, joneses
To have an eager or intense desire: was jonesing for caffeine.
References in periodicals archive ?
In many ways, the central figure of the book is not Cranborne--the chief tourist--or Inigo Jones, but the scholar-traveller John Finet.
In France, the Mannerist tradition was more widely acceptable than in Germany and England; nonetheless, a more restrained classicism, as seen in the work of Jones' contemporaries Salomon de Brosse and Jacques Lemercier, offers some intriguing parallels with Inigo Jones' work.
Occasionally, Ravelhofer's enthusiasm for contextual exploration leads her into eccentricity, as when she explores the relevance of the ambigram to Inigo Jones's experiments with perspective (p.
Inigo Jones (4.00) has been raised only 2lb for that game victory and he is just preferred to the top weight Sharmy.
Citing Jonson's 'Expostulation Against Inigo Jones', an apparent lampoon of The Essex House Masque in Jonson's The Gypsies Metamorphosed, and snide asides towards Jonson's Pan's Anniversary in The Essex House Masque, Raylor hints at another Poet's Quarrel, this time played out in the court halls rather than the private professional stage.
The chapters which follow are devoted to the masques of composer William Lawes, the visual representations of musical harmony sought by Inigo Jones, French influence on the Caroline masques of the 1630s, and masques presented in other venues than the court (including the famous masque by Milton presented at Ludlow Castle).
Inigo Jones produced one of his greatest effects: stars which dance in the heavens in time to the music, at the command of Prometheus.
Its dominating figure is Inigo Jones, and its pervading thesis that `important forms of art patronised by the Stuarts, including masques, heraldry, gardens, architecture, musical harmony, and processions ...
A chapter on "Music for the Eyes" deals primarily with Inigo Jones's contribution in terms of spectacle, his use of stage machinery and decor, its French and Italian influences, and the underlying humanistic doctrine.
His elaborate masque The Triumph of Peace (1634) was performed at the Inns of Court, with scenery by Inigo Jones and music by William Lawes.
Inigo Jones' 1637 Queen's House is incorporated into the museum and reopens May 2.
The men who made the greatest contribution to the development of the masque were Inigo Jones and Ben Jonson.