burial

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Related to Inhumations: exhumation

burial

see carcass disposal.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this respect, the initial inhumation of a man in half of the double burials might correspond to the ethnographic figure of the maternal uncle in a matrilineal order.
It is nevertheless likely that at least part of the disarticulated bones originate from complete inhumations which were analogous to the above-described male burial, and had been placed inside, above or in the vicinity of the cists.
Most Paleo-Aleuts were recovered from Chaluka midden as inhumations, whereas Neo-Aleuts were interred in burial caves as mummified remains, in accord with their tradition: "[t]he Unangan [Neo-Aleuts] preserved all deceased members of their community from new-born to elderly and of both sexes" (Frohlich and Laughlin, 2002:92).
Secondary inhumation consists of non-articulated collections of bones.
If, during our excavations we happen upon inhumations or cremations, we are required to apply for a licence from the local coroner in order to exhume.
Burial patterns: shift from native post-Roman inhumations without grave goods to inhumations with grave goods; in most parts the differences in body size of the male skeletons disappear at the end of the 7th century (Harke 2003: 19 ff.
Complex Kachemak mortuary practices were replaced by flexed inhumations in houses and middens, cremation, and cave burials.
En Ontario, on rencontre aussi des inhumations sans cremation (Williamson 1980: 3), seules ou en groupe.
The inhumations represented both sexes and ranged from infants to adults.
Researchers in the Levant and Anatolia have long suspected that, rather than being removed from a body prior to interment, crania and mandibles were obtained from primary inhumation burials, based on the absence of these elements in otherwise complete primary inhumations (Andrews and Bello 2006; Bienert 1991; Cauvin 1978, 1994; Erdal 2015; Kanjou et al.
Inhumations are displayed at Fondo 4 in Vega de Santa Lucia in Cordoba (Murillo 1994: 127-131), and at Pena de Arias Montano in Huelva (Gomez et al.
As a completely new phenomenon, inhumations with inclusions appeared in the second half of the 6th century in south-western Finland in Eura and in Koylio.