inhalation anesthetic

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in·ha·la·tion an·es·thet·ic

a gas or a liquid with vapor pressure sufficient to produce general anesthesia when breathed.

inhalation anesthetic

Anesthesiology An agent used to induce narcosis and absence of sensation Examples Halothane, isoflurane–a mainstay, desflurane, sevoflurane. See Desflurane, Halothane, Isoflurane, Nitrous oxide, Sevoflurane.

in·ha·la·tion an·es·thet·ic

(in'hă-lā'shŭn an'es-thet'ik)
A gas or a liquid with sufficient vapor pressure to produce general anesthesia when inhaled.

anesthetic

1. pertaining to, characterized by, or producing anesthesia.
2. a drug or agent used to abolish the sensation of pain, to achieve adequate muscle relaxation during surgery, to calm fear and allay anxiety. See also anesthesia.

dissociative anesthetic
an anesthetic causing interruption of cerebral association pathways between the limbic system and cortical system. It produces a catalepsy-like state, in which the patient feels dissociated from its environment, and marked analgesia. Ketamine, phencyclidine and tiletamine hydrochloride are examples.
gaseous anesthetic
inhalation anesthesia. Halothane and isoflurane are commonly used agents.
general anesthetic
see general anesthesia.
anesthetic-induced rhabdomyolysis
see porcine stress syndrome.
inhalation anesthetic
gas or volatile liquid that produces general anesthesia when inhaled. The older agents, ether and cyclopropane, have been replaced by halothane, enflurane and isoflurane.
injectable anesthetic
sedative-hypnotic drugs produce anesthesia when administered in large doses. It can be administered intraperitoneally, but intravenous injection is much the most common route. Short-acting drugs, such as thiopentone, are used alone for very rapid procedures or for instrument examinations, or as induction for a longer term inhalation anesthetic. See also barbiturate. One anesthetic agent that is administered intramuscularly is ketamine.
irreversible anesthetic
the injection of a substance that destroys the peripheral nerve, e.g. ethyl or propyl alcohol.
local anesthetic
a drug that blocks nerve transmission in the nerves affected by the local presence of the drug. It may be applied topically, e.g. into the conjunctival sac, or by injection into tissues near the target nerve. Most local anesthetics are in the -caine series.
anesthetic machine
apparatus or equipment used to administer gaseous anesthetic agents; functions of the apparatus should include,
1. delivery of oxygen,
2. removal of carbon dioxide,
3. quantifiable delivery of anesthetic vapor or gas, and
4. capability of providing artificial respiration to the patient.
anesthetic scavenging
the use of any device to reduce the pollution of the air in surgeries caused by exhaled anesthetic gases. May be canisters of filtering material attached to the machine or suction lines at stragetic positions in the theater.
volatile anesthetic
see inhalation anesthetic (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
We have previously described a system which provides real-time estimates and forward predictions of effect-site concentrations of inhalational anaesthetics (1).
Measurement of the concentration of the inhalational anaesthetic agent is a useful concept in anaesthesia (28) but impractical for use in the retrieval environment and confined vehicular spaces.
Potency of inhalational anaesthetics on contractures in normal and malignant hyperthermia susceptible muscle.
What is not so well known is that before the Project, fluorine was a difficult and dangerous element, while afterwards it became a key ingredient in all the new inhalational anaesthetics.
What is perhaps not so well known is that before the Project, fluorine was a difficult and dangerous element, while afterwards it became a key ingredient in all the new inhalational anaesthetics.