inhalation anesthetic

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in·ha·la·tion an·es·thet·ic

a gas or a liquid with vapor pressure sufficient to produce general anesthesia when breathed.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inhalation anesthetic

Anesthesiology An agent used to induce narcosis and absence of sensation Examples Halothane, isoflurane–a mainstay, desflurane, sevoflurane. See Desflurane, Halothane, Isoflurane, Nitrous oxide, Sevoflurane.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·ha·la·tion an·es·thet·ic

(in'hă-lā'shŭn an'es-thet'ik)
A gas or a liquid with sufficient vapor pressure to produce general anesthesia when inhaled.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, sevoflurane has been demonstrated as an amazing discovery among inhalational anaesthetic agents8.
At the end of operative procedure, inhalational anaesthetic agent was tapered and extubation was done after complete recovery.
We have previously described a system which provides real-time estimates and forward predictions of effect-site concentrations of inhalational anaesthetics (1).
Measurement of the concentration of the inhalational anaesthetic agent is a useful concept in anaesthesia (28) but impractical for use in the retrieval environment and confined vehicular spaces.
OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDS OF INHALATIONAL ANAESTHETICS. BEST PRACT RES CLIN ANAESTHESIOL 2003 MAR; 17(1): 147-61.
Inhalational anaesthetics in the ICU: theory and practice of inhalational sedation in the ICU, economics, riskbenefit.
Evoked potentials are affected by the use of anaesthetic agents including inhalational anaesthetics, intravenous anaesthetics and neuromuscular blockers.
The addition of [N.sub.2]O has also been associated with a less problematic induction of anaesthesia, with fewer adverse airway events and a higher probability of first time insertion of laryngeal mask (Smith 2006) and may improve intraoperative conditions compared to anaesthesia maintained with either intravenous or inhalational anaesthetics alone (Hopkins 2005).
Despite adequate filling pressures, the vasodilatory effects of inhalational anaesthetics combined with intraoperative fluid shifts associated with acute intestinal obstruction are likely to result in relative hypotension compared to baseline.