inhalant

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inhalant

 [in-ha´lant]
1. a substance that is or may be taken into the body by way of the nose and trachea (through the respiratory system).
2. a class of psychoactive substances whose volatile vapors are subject to abuse; see substance abuse.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·hal·ant

(in-hā'lănt),
1. That which is inhaled; a remedy given by inhalation.
See also: inhalation, aerosol.
2. A drug (or combination of drugs) with high vapor pressure, carried by an air current into the nasal passage, where it produces its effect.
See also: inhalation, aerosol.
3. A solution of a drug or combination of drugs for administration as a nebulized mist intended to reach the respiratory tree.
See also: inhalation, aerosol.
4. Group of products consisting of finely powdered or liquid drugs that are carried to the respiratory passages by the use of special devices such as low-pressure aerosol containers.
See also: inhalation, aerosol. Synonym(s): insufflation (2)
[see inhalation]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inhalant

(ĭn-hā′lənt)
adj.
Used in or for inhaling.
n.
1. A drug, such as an anesthetic or bronchodilator, or another substance, such as saline solution, inhaled for medicinal purposes in vapor or aerosol form.
2. A substance inhaled as an intoxicant, usually in the form of a vapor.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

inhalant

Public health A potentially hazardous particle, liquid or solid, which may be present in environmental air, and inhaled into small airways and alveoli. See Aerosol, Dust, Fiber, Fume, Gas, Mist, Vapor Substance abuse A term used in 2 contexts:
1. Nitrates–vasodilators that allegedly prolong orgasm;.
2. Solvents, which produce euphoria through neurotoxicity SA, nitrates Effects Vasodilation, ↑ blood flow to heart; may prolong orgasm Uses Relieves anginal pain Examples Amyl nitrate, butyl nitrate, isobutyl nitrate, isosorbide dinitrate, nitroglycerin, nitrous oxide, isobutylnitrite SA, neurotoxins Effects Bronchodilation, CNS depressant, metabolic inhibitor Examples Freon, tetrahydrocarbons, benzol-based emollients and derivatives, toluene-based compounds, ethyl ether, volatile solvents, aerosols, adhesives, etc Commonly abused products Air freshener, carburator cleaners, correction fluid,  spray deodorant, gasoline, glue, hairspray, lighter fluid, markers, nail polish remover, octane booster, paint thinner, rubber cement, spot remover, spray shoe polish, spray paint–especially gold and silver.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·hal·ant

(in-hāl'ănt)
1. That which is inhaled; a remedy given by inhalation.
2. A drug (or combination of drugs) with high vapor pressure, carried by an air current into the nasal passage, where it produces its effect.
3. Group of products consisting of finely powdered or liquid drugs that are carried to the respiratory passages by the use of special devices such as low-pressure aerosol containers.
Synonym(s): insufflation (2) .
See also: inhalation, aerosol
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Inhalant

Medicine that is breathed into the lungs.
Mentioned in: Antiasthmatic Drugs
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·hal·ant

(in-hāl'ănt)
A drug (or combination of drugs) with high vapor pressure, carried by an air current into the nasal passage, where it produces its effect.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about inhalant

Q. How can I know the inhaler is empty? My 8 years-old boy has asthma and he takes steroids with inhaler. Every time it runs out of med we get a prescription for a new one. Is that OK? A friend that her son is treated with similar inhaler told me that towards the end it no longer delivers enough medication. How can I know I should get a new one?

A. Here is a video you may find usefull:
<br><object width='425' height='355' id='FiveminPlayer'><param name='allowfullscreen' value='true'/><param name='movie' value='http://www.5min.com/Embeded/8938/'/><embed src='http://www.5min.com/Embeded/8938/' type='application/x-shockwave-flash' width='425' height='355' allowfullscreen='true'></embed></object>

Q. What are the side effects for the regular asthma inhalers? I am taking an inhaler (non-steroid one) for my asthma and I wanted to know what can be possible side effects to this treatment.

A. Simple inhalers that contain a material that helps with keeping the bronchi not constricted, have side effects that are related to the sympathetic nervous system- such as slight tremor, small increase in heart rate or blood pressure, but these are all in greater risk when taking in a not-inhaled way. Patients must be cautioned against using these medicines too frequently, as with such use their efficacy may decline, producing desensitization resulting in an exacerbation of symptoms which may lead to refractory asthma, meaning that the attack might not be relieved by these medications anymore.

Q. Is a Proventil Inhaler cheaper by you than Secirity Blue? I pay $60. with Security Blue now. Is it cheaper with you for a three months supply ?

A. here is a drug prices comparing site-
http://www.compare-prescription-prices.com/drug/Proventil.htm

but i couldn't find there that other drug you were talking about....is that it's name?

More discussions about inhalant
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References in periodicals archive ?
(7,15,34-43) In said period, inhalants occupied between the first and fourth places as a drug of preference, excluding alcohol and tobacco.
Despite the fact that current data demonstrate that dependence on inhalants is a real phenomenon (Perron, Howard, Vaughn & Jarman, 2009; Ogel & Coskun, 2011) and clinical behavioral evidence shows that craving is a key component in this process (Volkow et al., 2006), so far there has been no measurable evidence of craving in inhalant users.
Most of the inhalants are simple carbon based molecules (acetone, ethyl chloride, toluene, xylene, benzene, propane, butane, hexane).
Comment: The dangers of inhalant abuse are well known.
Examples of the harmful effects of inhalants are hazardous of Toluene, which is a constituent of spray paints, glue, wax removers, and fingernail polish.
Most inhalants won't be detected by standard urine drug screens.
The use of inhalants declined among 8th and 10th graders despite a decline in perceived risk (Twelfth-graders were not asked about inhalants.) The use of cocaine powder has been falling over the last few years and continued sliding in 2011.
However, among children and adolescents, inhalants constituted a major group of substances of abuse.
The survey, released in March and conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), also shows that in 2008, 32% of the adults who had treatment admissions involving inhalants were aged 30-44 years, and 16% were 45 and older.
Caudle said the only definitive way to know whether patients are addicted to inhalants is to ask.
Inhalant use refers to the intentional inhalation of chemical vapors for the purpose of producing psychoactive effects.