Ingelfinger rule

In·gel·fin·ger rule

(ing'gel-fing'gĕr),
a principle developed by Franz Ingelfinger for use in the editorial offices of the New England Journal of Medicine, stating that original articles submitted for publication will be reviewed on the understanding that the same information will not be submitted for publication elsewhere during the period of review; has been adopted by many other peer-reviewed medical journals.
Guidelines delineated by Franz J. Ingelfinger, MD, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, who felt that 2 criteria were imperative in accepting papers for publication in a scientific journal of high quality:
1. A news embargo on articles scheduled for appearance in the journal and
2. Strict application of the Ingelfinger rule:
‘The journal undertakes review with the understanding that neither the substance of the article nor the figures or tables have been published or will be submitted for publication during the period of review. This restriction does not apply to abstracts published in connection with scientific meetings or to news reports based on public presentations at such meetings’; the Rule has become the standard for quality medical and scientific journalism

In·gel·fin·ger rule

(ing'gĕl-fing'gĕr rūl)
A principle developed by Franz Ingelfinger for use in the editorial offices of the New England Journal of Medicine, stating that original articles submitted for publication will be reviewed on the understanding that the same information will not be submitted for publication elsewhere during the period of review; has been adopted by many other peer-reviewed medical journals.
References in periodicals archive ?
A practical concern for researchers that requires further clarification is the so-called 'Ingelfinger rule'.
The first part of this period was captured in the "Ingelfinger rule" of 1969, which was an embargo to keep scientific results out of the media until they were published in peer-reviewed journals (Toy 2002).
The Ingelfinger Rule: Franz Ingelfinger at the New England Journal of Medicine 19671977.
Should research be publicized before publication: An appraisal of Ingelfinger rule. Natl Med J India 1989; 1:257-8.
In journal publication, it is prohibited by the rule what is known as the 'Ingelfinger rule', named after the editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, Franz Ingelfinger.
Not only the web, but the dominance of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising makes obsolete the Ingelfinger rule begun mid-20th century.
Not only have they routinely acquired the copyright of papers they publish, but they have also often sought to acquire exclusivity retrospectively too--a strategy made manifest in 1969 with the so-called Ingelfinger rule. The latter formalized the practice (subsequently widely adopted by other medical journals) of refusing any manuscript if its substance had been previously submitted or reported elsewhere.
Critics of the Ingelfinger rule decry it as little more than "a marketing device that allows privately owned medical journals substantial income from publishing copyrighted reports based on taxpayer-supported research." (27) They view the policy as an infringement on free public discussion of critical issues, and a potential impediment to accountability of publicly funded research.
Kassirer, "The Ingelfinger Rule Revisited," NEJM 325 (1991): 1371-73; B.J.
Altman, "The Ingelfinger Rule, Embargoes, and Journal Peer Review--Part 1" Lancet 347 (1996): 1382-86; L.K.
But it comes with strings (some say chains) attached: an embargo, which can put a straitjacket on enterprise, and the controversial "Ingelfinger rule," a warning that the Journal's editors will reject any paper that has been previously published -- a rule critics say has become a gag order on scientists and a disservice to the public.
There are two longstanding rules at The New England Journal of Medicine: a pre-publication embargo date and the Ingelfinger rule. Controversy about both ebbs and flows, but never goes away altogether.