Infusoria


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In·fu·so·ri·a

(in'fyū-sō'rē-ă),
Archaic term for Ciliophora.
[Mod. L. pertaining to or found in an infusion, fr. in-fundo, pp. in-fusus, to pour in]

Infusoria

(ĭn-fū-sō′rē-ă)
The former name of a class of Protozoa, now called Ciliata.

infusoria

any organisms found in INFUSIONS of organic material, such as Protozoa, Rotifers, etc. The term is sometimes restricted to the CILIATES.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the solutions of all investigated compounds the exponential dependence of the infusoria mortality rate was characteristic, irrespective of the produced effect (Figures 4 and 5) [33, 34].
In such activated sludge, both saprozites (bacteria, fungi, and flagellates) and holozoic organisms (bacteriophages and predators--free-floating and attached infusoria) are present.
Notes on the freshwater infusoria of the island of Bombay.
Stockmann, the primary founder of the Baths, finds out through reliable tests that the water supply of the Baths is contaminated with infusoria, (2) and this endangers the health of the patrons and visitors of the establishment.
A history of infusoria, including the Desmidiaceae and Diatomaceae, Bristish and Foreign.
In addition, he argued that the animal kingdom consisted not of a single series of beings ranging from infusoria to man, but of four irreducible embranchements, or groups containing animals of similar construction.(16) The members of each group can be arranged on a miniature scale from highest to lowest, but from one group to another there is an unbridgeable gulf.