IRAS

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Related to Infrared Astronomical Satellite: Infrared Astronomy Satellite

IRAS

Integrated Research Application System. A system in the UK which is meant to streamline some aspects of performing research on human patients by automatically completing all forms required for a particular study, including those for ethics committees, governance departments, and the Medicine and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency. The forms are then processed by the relevant bodies. Once global permission is granted, IRAS generates a list of documents needed by local departments—e.g., CVs of local researchers, local versions of patient information and study documentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatoin in Penticton, British Columbia, Dewdney and his colleagues used data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to zero in on areas of warm dust - likely settings for starbirth.
As the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) showed in the 1980s, this dust is everywhere.
Based on data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), the map reveals that galaxies within 450 million light-years of the Milky Way have a markedly uneven arrangement.
The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) opened a new era in space mineralogy in 1982.
Now astronomers are combining the results of radio-telescope surveys and data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to obtain a more complete picture of how these short-lived stars form and evolve.
They added far-infrared data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS).
Data collected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) have turned out to be useful for garnering information about occupants of the Bootes void.
Now, by reprocessing archival images from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), Alberto Noriega-Crespo (Caltech) and his colleagues have found evidence that Betelgeuse indeed impacts its surroundings.
First detected in the galactic womb by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite in 1983, the embryo contains about one-fourth the mass of gas sun but lies at the center of a cloud of gas and dust 10 times the size of our solar system.

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