privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
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References in periodicals archive ?
[13] developed a Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) model, which identifies four dimensions of privacy concerns: collection, secondary use, errors, and improper access to personal information According to Smith et al.
conceptualize information privacy, including property-based, spatial,
We used a conceptual framework that contained the important factors influencing patients' information privacy concerns.
Smith et al., 2011), clearly, information privacy is foremost on the minds of online banking patrons and should be addressed accordingly.
protections for information privacy that are also sensitive to
Recent research has merged personal communication and data privacy into what is referred to as information privacy, due to the increased digitalization of information and communications (BELANGER & CROSSLER, 2011; PAVLOU, 2011).
However, research shows that many consumers either do not read or do not fully comprehend e-tailers' information privacy policies thus raising questions about their effectiveness in reducing customers' information privacy concerns (Cranor et al., 2006; Meinert et al., 2006; Milne & Culnan, 2004; Milne et al., 2006; Vail et al., 2008, Nehf, 2007; Proctor et al., 2008).
The report, titled Protecting Information Privacy, suggests it is difficult for members of the public to know what information is held on them by the government, and its agencies or private bodies.
* Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA).
No single set of laws covers privacy or monitoring at work but some states have laws relating to information privacy and surveillance.
TCC's security solutions protect information privacy on every continent in over 110 countries.

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