natural language

(redirected from Informal speech)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

natural language

Language as used in ordinary verbal and written communication among humans, as distinguished from controlled vocabularies and structured languages used exclusively for communicating and interoperability among information systems.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
One idea is to have an informal speech introducing ourselves, then relating anecdotes about early chemistry experiences.
There are a number of stylistic infelicities ("reigned by God's behest" [14]) and an occasional resort to slang and informal speech ("the stereotype of George as gormless" [180]), which may bother some readers.
They will interpret figurative language, colorful expressions, and local informal speech. They will learn to adapt language to meet different social and situational needs.
In a separate informal speech, Megawati expressed concerns that people are focusing attention only on the forthcoming presidential election, tentatively scheduled for early November, and ignoring more important things, such as violence in East Timor, the troubled province of Aceh and riot-torn Ambon Island.
The Harper Dictionary of Contemporary Usage recommends observing the distinction informal speech and written communication, but observes that in informal speech the two prepositions have become interchangeable.
Its colloquial replacement relies heavily on slang and informal speech.

Full browser ?