inflection

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inflection

 [in´flek-shun]
the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn),
1. An inward bending.
2. Obsolete term for diffraction.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn)
An inward bending.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]
References in periodicals archive ?
Under an approach of this kind, paradigms are recognised on the basis of semantic relations, and stem suppletion is a possibility in derivational paradigms just as it is, quite uncontroversially, in inflectional paradigms, (...) This, it seems to me, is to somewhat underplay the innovative character of what Koshiishi is proposing.
However, it is even more interesting to note that a typo-logical parallel is offered by the future tense of some New Indo-Aryan Languages of the east central zone (Eastern Hindi and Bihari group; Masica 1991: 289-91), where within the same inflectional paradigm the -h-future forms are in complementary distribution with -b-forms whose stem continues the old gerundive in -tavya-(on the corresponding finitization process, see Bubenik 1998: 193-95).
In fact, while with FPS we can surely say that--esker- is not part anymore of an inflectional paradigm, in PPS the morphemes--esker-, -aker-, -enger- show, beside the new derivational value, some continuity of the old inflectional function with a stronger paradigmatic cohesion.
The group consists of ik-verbs whose inflectional paradigms are defective.
This is NOT the case: the earliest finite forms are predominantly auxiliary-like items that have in Dutch often impoverished inflectional paradigms lacking overt inflectional endings.
Since one of the major characteristics of the process of inflection is variation of both form and meaning/function with respect to a given word, an advantage of accepting disjunctive values is that it captures the fact that the same inflectional affix may participate in more than one inflectional paradigm. It also accounts for the fact that the same affix may express various functions: see, for example, case syncretism, a phenomenon that is common in languages like Greek or Latin (see Ralli 1997, 1999 for more details on this).
(7) The only one of Mayerthaler's naturalness (sub-)principles that suppletive inflectional paradigms do not generally violate is semantic transparency.
2016, Joint Predictiveness in Inflectional Paradigms.--Word Structure 9 (2), 156-182.
As a way of organizing and systematizing inflectional and derivational data, a description in terms of paradigms must deal with special cases, such as suppletion, gaps in derivational paradigms, defective inflectional paradigms and doublets or overabundance (Bonami & Strnadova 2018), among others.
Scholars from the US and France address Ferdinand de SaussureAEs influence on descriptive and historical analysis in historical linguistics; the connection between inflectional paradigms as an occasional determinant of sound change; the nature of the phoneme and morpheme to arrive at an intermediate entity, the morpho(pho)neme; a framework for examining the modification of morpho-syntactic categories and the rise of new patterns to express them; and language change in contemporary linguistics communities.
A more general question related to this "noise" might be to what extent inflectional paradigms with phonologically heavily reduced desinences can still provide a reliable base for a study that is grounded in iconicity between (phonological) form and meaning.