morpheme

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Related to Inflectional morpheme: free morpheme, Derivational morpheme

mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
We follow Myers-Scotton (1993, 1997) in using the term system morpheme from Bolinger (1968); he applied it to both inflectional morphemes and function words.
As previously mentioned, the outcome of genitives in Piedmont Sinti is interesting for the diachronic process they may have undergone, that is an upgrading of an inflectional morpheme to a derivational one, and for the different paradigm reorganisation occurred in the two varieties.
en blinder 'a blind person'), a context that allows the development of derogatory meaning and the following reanalysis of the inflectional morpheme as a derivational suffix with derogatory meaning (e.g.
At the very least, it appears that English is quite different from even typologically related languages like German, Dutch, or Swedish in regard to the exponence and syntactic properties of inflectional morphemes. Verbs in German, standard Dutch, and Swedish are inflected for tense (and agreement, excepting Swedish), and do support is nonexistent in these languages.
Here, as is believed, inflectional morphemes are those that are required obligatorily by the sentence syntax: for good measure, they enter operations which leave syntactic categories of base morphemes untouched.
Table 2 only lists those inflectional morphemes that are crucially verbal (i.e., those that do not change the category of the verb).
First, it is an agglutinative language (such as Finnish or Turkish) so that all inflectional morphemes are morphologically complex, corresponding to phrases or inflected verbs, comprising several morphological constituents (De Rijk, 2007; Hualde & Ortiz de Urbina, 2003; Laka, 1996).
In other words, partially-naturalised ATTs are not productive for other derivations, "[t]hese accept only the addition of inflectional morphemes, usually the regular plural marker" (Mahadin, 1996, p.
Greenberg proposed three synthesis indices: the inflectional morphemes per word ratio, the derivational morphemes per word ratio, and the root morphemes per word ratio (to deal with compounds).
In Old English, this definition comprises four subtypes: (i) zero derivation with inflectional morphemes and without derivational morphemes, as in ridan "to ride" > ridda "rider"; (ii) zero derivation without explicit morphemes, either inflectional or derivational, as in bidan "to delay" > bid "delay"; (iii) zero derivation with or without explicit inflection but displaying ablaut, such as, respectively, cnawan "to know" > cneowian "to know carnally" and drifan "to drive" > draf "action of driving"; and (iv) zero derivation with formatives that cannot be considered derivational affixes in synchronic analysis, such as -m in fleon "to fly" > fleam "flight."