sequence

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se·quence

(sē'kwens),
1. The succession, or following, of one thing, process, or event after another; in dysmorphology, a pattern of multiple anomalies derived from a single known or presumed prior anomaly or mechanical factor.
2. The imposition of a paricular order on a number of items.
Synonym(s): anomalad (2) , complex (8)
[L. sequor, to follow]

sequence

(sē′kwəns, -kwĕns′)
n.
1. A following of one thing after another; succession.
2. An order of succession; an arrangement.
3. Biochemistry The order of constituents in a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the amino acids in a protein.
tr.v. se·quenced, se·quencing, se·quences
1. To organize or arrange in a sequence.
2. To determine the order of constituents in (a polymer, such as a nucleic acid or protein molecule).

sequence

Medspeak
The order of performing a task.

Molecular biology
noun A heteromeric chain of similar, but not identical molecules—e.g., nucleotides (in a gene) or amino acids (in a protein).

verb To determine the order of a sequence.

Paediatrics
(1) An array of multiple congenital anomalies resulting from an early single primary defect of morphogenesis which unleashes a cascade of secondary and tertiary defects.
(2) A group of clinicopathologic consequences of the aberrant formation of one or more early embryologic structures.

sequence

Pediatrics Anomalad An array of multiple congenital anomalies resulting from an early single 1º defect of morphogenesis that unleashes a 'cascade' of 2º and 3º defects; a sequence is also defined as a set of clinicopathologic consequences of the aberrant formation of one or more early embryologic structures. See Dysmorphology.
Sequence types  
Malformation Incorrect formation of tissues
Deformation Abnormal forces acting on normal tissues
Disruption Breakdown of normal tissue
Note: The Pierre-Robin sequence is caused by 1º mandibular hypoplasia, which results in a tongue that is too small for the oral cavity and which drops back–glossoptosis, blocking closure of the posterior palatal shelf, resulting in a high arched U-shaped cleft palate Examples of sequences include athyroidotic hypothyroidism sequence, DiGeorge sequence, early urethral obstruction sequence, bladder exstrophy sequence, cloacal extrophy sequence, holoprosencephaly sequence, jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence, Kartagener syndrome/sequence, Klippel-Feil sequence, laterality sequence, meningomyelocele, anencephaly, iniencephaly sequence, occult spinal dysraphism sequence, oligohydramnios sequence, Rokitansky sequence, septo-optic dysplasia–de Morsier sequence, sirenomelia sequence

se·quence

(sē'kwĕns)
The succession, or following, of one thing or event after another.
[L. sequor, to follow]

se·quence

(sē'kwĕns)
1. Succession, or following, of one thing, process, or event after another.
2. Imposition of a particular order on several items.
[L. sequor, to follow]
References in periodicals archive ?
The infinite sequence of actions T = ([a.sub.1], [a.sub.2],..., [a.sub.n],...) describing the Littlewood-Ross super-task is consistent with this partitioning as each of the actions operates only on statements in [U.sup.1].
Obviously, by means of the abstract continuity principle, we define a limit state T(S) of an infinite sequence of states if that sequence satisfies certain conditions.
Above we said that, without further assumptions concerning the outcome of the super-task, the infinite sequence of well-defined acts implies nothing whatsoever with respect to the situation that arises after the execution of all those acts.
For example, suppose that P is a countably additive Bayesian probability function defined on a [Sigma]-field F of subsets of the set [Omega] of all infinite sequences of 0s and 1s.
De Finetti's well-known representation theorem for infinite sequences of exchangeable events implies that with probability 1 limits of relative frequencies exist (though the implication requires countable additivity which de Finetti always resisted).
The other stock objection of chance theorists to frequency theories is that the invocation of infinite sequences of trials is neither necessary nor desirable to underpin the use of objective probabilities in science and elsewhere.
Milne has shown [1993] that the calculus of upper and lower probabilities has, mutatis mutandis, also the same dual interpretation as the standard probability calculus, both as a system of consistency constraints on belief, and as limits of long-run relative frequencies, in the latter case the limits supremum and infimum respectively of the relative frequencies of a particular character in an infinite sequence of characters.
Von Mises's theory is based on his notion of a collective, which is an infinite sequence W of attributes from some finite or denumerably infinite set A of attributes, satisfying two conditions:
Briefly, a probability forecasting system assigns to each in an infinite sequence of two-valued random variables [A.sub.i] a probability whose value at each index i may depend not only on i but also on the observed values of the [A.sub.j], j [less than] i.