inference

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in·fer·ence

(in'fĕr-ens),
The logical process of passing from observations and axioms to generalizations; in statistics, the development of generalizations from sample data, usually with calculated degrees of uncertainty.

inference

(in′f(ĕ-)rĕns)
A conclusion drawn by a logical analysis of the available evidence.

inference

a conclusion about a population derived from a sample of the population.
References in classic literature ?
I only quote this as a trivial example of observation and inference.
I think that I am fairly justified in my inferences.
Before deciding that question I had grasped the significance of the silence of the dog, for one true inference invariably suggests others.
Inference,--that your brother was often at low water.
Now, if we may trust these facts and inferences, and therefore conclude that varieties linking two other varieties together have generally existed in lesser numbers than the forms which they connect, then, I think, we can understand why intermediate varieties should not endure for very long periods;--why as a general rule they should be exterminated and disappear, sooner than the forms which they originally linked together.
A soldier possessed by Genestas' passion for domestic economy could not help at once drawing inferences as to the life and character of its owner from the gateway before him; and this, in spite of his habits of circumspection, he in nowise failed to do.
He was impervious to words, to facts, to inferences.
Do not be alarmed,' said he: 'what I wish to say is nothing in itself; and I will leave you to draw your own inferences from it.
The more such inferences are examined, the more precarious they are seen to be.
And even as to me,' continued Jasper, still pursuing the new track, with ardour, and, as he did so, brightening with hope: 'he knew that you were coming to me; he knew that you were intrusted to tell me what you have told me; if your doing so has awakened a new train of thought in my perplexed mind, it reasonably follows that, from the same premises, he might have foreseen the inferences that I should draw.
I propose to tell you--in the first place--what is known of the manner in which your cousin met his death; appending to the statement such inferences and conclusions as we are justified (according to my opinion) in drawing from the facts.
There are a few of the serious inferences which we are led by the hand to in this book, and these are fully sufficient to justify any man in recommending it to the world, and much more to justify the publication of it.