disease surveillance

(redirected from Infectious disease reporting)

disease surveillance

In epidemiology and public health, the identification of index patients and their contacts; the detection of outbreaks and epidemics; the determination of the incidence and demographics of an illness; and the policy making that may prevent further spreading of a disease.
See also: surveillance
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2012, a total of 29 cases of shigellosis were reported in Ireland through the Computerized Infectious Disease Reporting system (crude incidence rate 0.63 cases/100,000 population).
Data from the Computerized Infectious Disease Reporting system (2010-2013) identified 72 reported cases of S.
Pneumonia incidence differs between countries, possibly due to socioeconomic factors, differences in infectious disease reporting, and heterogeneity of diagnostics.
The new e-notification system which can be accessed from any healthcare facility, is a must use tool for infectious disease reporting at all healthcare service providers.
The department's proposal contains even more stringent confidentiality requirements than those currently in place for infectious disease reporting, where information can be disclosed to protect the public's health.
Traditionally, infectious disease reporting has relied on a single methodology--mandated reporting of all cases.
No state or territorial health department indicated that a formal agreement existed with any health maintenance organization for using nurse hotline records, computerized patient records or billing data to improve infectious disease reporting. Only 5 health departments had an agreement of any type with the Indian Health Service (IHS) for disease reporting, and most of these agreements are only for specific diseases such as tuberculosis or AIDS reporting.
Analysis of timeliness of infectious disease reporting in the Netherlands.
Current federal funding for emergency preparedness surveillance and epidemiology capacity (17) is expected to stimulate widespread use of automated systems in infectious disease reporting. However, automated systems are a complement rather than a substitute for human involvement in interpreting laboratory findings and screening for errors.

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