infant botulism


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Related to infant botulism: Clostridium botulinum

botulism

 [boch´u-lizm]
1. any poisoning caused by Clostridium botulinum in the body; it produces a neurotoxin called botulinum toxin.
2. specifically, a rare but severe, often fatal, form of food poisoning due to ingestion of improperly canned or preserved foods contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. Called also foodborne botulism. Symptoms include vomiting, abdominal pain, headache, weakness, constipation, and nerve paralysis (causing difficulty in seeing, breathing, and swallowing), with death from paralysis of the respiratory organs. To prevent botulism, home canning and preserving of all nonacid foods (that is, all foods other than fruits and tomatoes) must be done according to proper specific directions.
Treatment. Treatment is determined based on the type of botulism, but careful respiratory assessment and support are always required. An antitoxin to block the action of toxin circulating in the blood can be used for foodborne and wound botulism if the problem is diagnosed and treated early.
foodborne botulism botulism (def. 2).
infant botulism that affecting infants, typically 4 to 26 weeks of age, marked by constipation, lethargy, hypotonia, and feeding difficulty; it may lead to respiratory insufficiency. It results from toxin produced in the gut by ingested organisms, rather than from preformed toxins.
wound botulism a form resulting from infection of a wound with Clostridium botulinum.

infant botulism

an intoxication by neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum that occurs in children less than 6 months of age. The condition is characterized by severe hypotonicity of all muscles, constipation, lethargy, and feeding difficulties, and it may lead to respiratory insufficiency. The botulism neurotoxin is usually found in the GI tract rather than in the blood, indicating that it is probably produced in the gut rather than ingested. The epidemiological and pathophysiological characteristics of the syndrome are not clearly understood.
interventions Treatment is supportive, including optimal management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition. Ventilatory support may also be necessary. There is no evidence that antitoxin therapy is helpful, and it is usually not recommended.

infant botulism

Pediatrics An acute, potentially fatal infection by spores from Clostridium botulinum, a spore-forming bug found in dust, honey, and elsewhere, affecting infants up to 10 months Risk factors Unknown, breast feeding, honey in diet

infant botulism

A form of botulism that affects infants less than 1 year old who ingest soil or food (esp. honey) containing Clostridium botulinum spores. The infant's protective intestinal flora is not yet established, and the spores germinate into active bacteria that produce the neurotoxin. It is treated with oral amoxicillin.

Symptoms

The symptoms include constipation, lethargy, listlessness, poor feeding, ptosis, loss of head control, difficulty in swallowing, hypotonia, generalized weakness, and respiratory insufficiency. The disease may be mild or severe.

See also: botulism
References in periodicals archive ?
Constipation is often the first sign of infant botulism.
1] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Blank Children's Hospital, Des Moines, Iowa, [2] Division of Acute Disease Prevention, Emergency Response, and Environmental Health, Iowa Department of Public Health, [3] Infant Botulism Treatment and Prevention Program, California Department of Public Health (Corresponding author: Amaran Moodley, amaran.
Six out of eight of the most recent infant botulism cases in the UK have had a history of being given honey; and for two of the cases C.
Honey and other environmental risk factors for infant botulism.
Dr Sarah Rowles, at the Food Standards Agency in Wales, said: "For around the first six months babies only need breast milk or infant formula and although it might be tempting to give honey for easing coughs, infant botulism is a very serious illness and it simply isn't worth the risk.
Dr Sarah Rowles, at the Food Standards Agency in Wales said: "For around the first six months babies only need breast milk or infant formula and although it might be tempting to give honey for easing coughs, infant botulism is a very serious illness and it simply isn't worth the risk.
This article will present two cases of infant botulism that were reported in year 2008 in El Paso, Texas.
Babies with infant botulism excessively cry, have constipation, and fail to thrive.
The bacteria can also be isolated from the stool of persons with foodborne and infant botulism.
Formula found in the home tested positive for the same strain of infant botulism suffered by the baby.
The move comes after tests on food products used in the home of a family involved in an infant botulism case.
BATCHES of powdered milk were being recalled today after a five- month-old girl contracted infant botulism.