indolent

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indolent

 [in´do-lent]
1. causing little pain.
2. slow growing.

in·do·lent

(in'dō-lent),
Inactive; sluggish; painless or nearly so, said of a morbid process.
[L. in- neg. + doleo, pr. p. dolens (-ent-), to feel pain]

indolent

(ĭn′də-lənt)
adj.
1.
a. Disinclined to exert oneself; habitually lazy.
b. Conducive to inactivity or laziness; lethargic: humid, indolent weather.
2.
a. Causing little or no pain: an indolent tumor.
b. Slow to heal, grow, or develop; inactive: an indolent ulcer.

in′do·lent·ly adv.

indolent

adjective
Medspeak
Referring to a condition that may linger longer, but often slowly progresses to a more advanced stage—e.g., indolent lymphoma, indolent malignancy, indolent myeloma.

Vox populi
Slow growing.

indolent

Medtalk adjective Referring to a condition which may linger longer, but often slowly progresses to a more advanced stage, as in an indolent CA Vox populi Slow growing

in·do·lent

(in'dō-lĕnt)
Inactive; sluggish; painless or nearly so, said of a morbid process.
[L. in- neg. + doleo, pr. p. dolens (-ent-), to feel pain]

indolent

Of slow progression or taking a long time to heal. Causing little or no pain. Often used of skin ulcers.
References in classic literature ?
This fidgety anxiety about his keys and his cupboards might be the result of the inbred restlessness of his disposition, aggravated in a naturally active man by the aimless indolence of a life in retirement -- a life drifting backward and forward among trifles, with no regular employment to steady it at any given hour of the day.
She had set out at an early hour, but had lingered on the road, inclined by her indolence to believe that if she waited under a warm shed the snow would cease to fall.
We have to slay pride in giants, envy by generosity and nobleness of heart, anger by calmness of demeanour and equanimity, gluttony and sloth by the spareness of our diet and the length of our vigils, lust and lewdness by the loyalty we preserve to those whom we have made the mistresses of our thoughts, indolence by traversing the world in all directions seeking opportunities of making ourselves, besides Christians, famous knights.
When the first transports of rage which had produced his activity in seeking her were over, he naturally returned to all his former indolence. His letter was soon dispatched; for, though dilatory in undertaking business, he was quick in its execution.