indication

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indication

 [in″dĭ-ka´shun]
a sign or circumstance that points to or shows the cause, treatment, or some other aspect of a disease.

in·di·ca·tion

(in'di-kā'shŭn),
The basis for initiation of a treatment for a disease or of a diagnostic test; may be furnished by a knowledge of the cause (causal indication), by the symptoms present (symptomatic indication), or by the nature of the disease (specific indication).
[L. fr. in-dico, pp. -atus, to point out, fr. dico, to proclaim]

indication

[in′dikā′shən]
Etymology: L, indicare, to make known
a reason to prescribe a medication or perform a treatment. A bacterial infection may be an indication for the prescription of a specific antibiotic; appendicitis is an indication for appendectomy. indicate, v.

indication

A health problem or disease that is identified as likely to be benefited by a therapy being studied in clinical trials. Once such a benefit has been established and approved by regulatory authorities, the therapy is said to be approved for a specified indication.

indication

Internal medicine A clinical Sx or circumstance indicating that the use of a particular intervention would be appropriate. Cf Contraindication.

in·di·ca·tion

(in'di-kā'shŭn)
The basis or rationale for using a particular treatment or diagnostic test; may be furnished by a knowledge of the cause (causal indication), by the symptoms present (symptomatic indication), or by the nature of the disease (specific indication).
[L. fr. in-dico, pp. -atus, to point out, fr. dico, to proclaim]

indication (in·d·kāˑ·shn),

n an appropriate therapeutic treatment for a given condition; will have beneficial effects and promote healing.

in·di·ca·tion

(in'di-kā'shŭn)
The basis for initiation of a treatment for a disease or of a diagnostic test.
[L. fr. in-dico, pp. -atus, to point out, fr. dico, to proclaim]

indication,

n that which serves as a guide or warning.

indication

a sign or circumstance that points to or shows the cause, treatment, etc. of a disease. See also indicant.

Patient discussion about indication

Q. What could be the reason? I do go for exercise but the result is not satisfactory to me although I followed good diet, timing etc. What could be the reason?

A. can you list in detail here what you do, what you eat? etc? Your successes and failures? Then we can help you a bit more. Maybe you have plateaued and need to change things up.

Q. What the reasons to the migraine?

A. A migraine headache has many triggers- among which are different foods (cheese, red wine), drinking coffee or caffeine containing beverages, lack of sleep, smoking, drinking alcohol, exposure to strong noise and more. There is also a genetic factor, and you see migraine more in people whose relatives suffer from it too.

Q. what do you think the reason would be? As per the latest statistics that 2 out of 150 kids born in the U.S. has autism, and the incidence rate is increasing, what do you think the reason would be?

A. The actual statistics is not 2 out of 150. It is 1 out of 150. I don't think autism is increasing, I think more children are being labeled as autistic - the condition is more well known than it was 20 years ago.

More discussions about indication
References in classic literature ?
There were indications as to the direction from which the dead traveler had come.
Nothing contentious, you understand, but only an indication that there are greater deeps beyond.
A superficial traveller might object to the dirt, which is their leading characteristic; but to those who view it as an indication of traffic and commercial prosperity, it is truly gratifying.
nor did he at any time evince any indication of the savage temper that had marked his resentment of the attack of the sailors upon him at the time that he had come among them.
In a well- regulated body politic this natural desire on the part of a spirited young gentleman so highly connected would be speedily recognized, but somehow William Buffy found when he came in that these were not times in which he could manage that little matter either, and this was the second indication Sir Leicester Dedlock had conveyed to him that the country was going to pieces.
She has given a faint indication of intending to speak.
My first cursory inspection of the face of the cliffs filled my heart with forebodings, since nowhere could I discern, except where the weird herald stood still shrieking his shrill summons, the faintest indication of even a bare foothold upon the lofty escarpment.
The face of the entire cliff was, as later inspection conclusively proved, so shot with veins and patches of solid gold as to quite present the appearance of a solid wall of that precious metal except where it was broken by outcroppings of ruby, emerald, and diamond boulders--a faint and alluring indication of the vast and unguessable riches which lay deeply buried behind the magnificent surface.
Here she lay breathless watching the lion; but the beast gave no indication that he had heard aught to arouse his suspicions.
But though the spoor left by the fifty frightful men, unversed in woodcraft as they were, would have been as plain to the densest denizen of the jungle as a city street to the Englishman, yet he crossed and recrossed it twenty times without observing the slightest indication that many men had passed that way but a few short hours since.
However, in the disturbed state of my mind, I did go into the deserted court and did look at all the footprints I could find there, seeking for some indication, as a basis for reasoning.
Yet they were almost upon him before he had the slightest indication of their presence.