politically correct

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Referring to language reflecting awareness and sensitivity to another person’s physical, mental, cultural, or other disadvantages or deviations from a norm

politically correct

Politically sensitive adjective Referring to language reflecting awareness and sensitivity to another person's physical, mental, cultural, or other disadvantages or deviations from a norm; a person is not mentally retarded, but rather mentally challenged; a person is not obese but rather has an eating disorder, etc
Politically correct-a microglossary
Former term PC term
American Indian Native American
Black African American
Demented Disoriented, severely confused
Handicapped Disadvantaged
Homophobic Heterosexually biased
Housebound Domestic
(American) Indian  Native American
Mentally retarded Mentally disabled or challenged
Obese Large, ample, right-sized
Oriental  Asian
Physically handicapped Physically disadvantaged
Poorly educated Educationally disadvantaged
Racist Culturally insensitive
Stupid Educationally challenged
Politically correct ad absurdum–a microglossary
PCAA term Translation
Colorful Flaky, fruity
Detail oriented  Anal-retentive or, if extreme, obsessive compulsive
Eccentric  Nuts, weird
Enthusiastic & hopeful  Insufferably arrogant
Follicly challenged  Bald
Knowledge deficient Ignorant
Obtunded Stupid
Sexual arts specialist  Prostitute, hooker
Sexual arts aficionado  Slut, sleaze
Vertically challenged Short
Vertically enhanced  Tall
Visually challenged Myopic  
References in classic literature ?
The immense droves of horses owned by the Indians consumed the herbage of the surrounding hills; while to drive them to any distant pasturage, in a neighborhood abounding with lurking and deadly enemies, would be to endanger the loss both of man and beast.
One object of Captain Bonneville in wintering among these Indians was to procure a supply of horses against the spring.
We proceeded with all possible expedition until we came within fifteen miles of where Boonsborough now stands, and where we were fired upon by a party of Indians that killed two, and wounded two of our number; yet, although surprised and taken at a disadvantage, we stood our ground.
On the fourth day, the Indians killed one of our men.
The Indian put a third and last question: "Will the English gentleman come here, as he has promised to come, at the close of day?
The chief Indian said something in his own language to the other two, pointing to the boy, and pointing towards the town, in which (as we afterwards discovered) they were lodged.
The wandering tribes of horse Indians, which have always occupied the greater part of this country, having of late much harassed the outlying estancias, the government at Buenos Ayres equipped some time since an army under the command of General Rosas for the purpose of exterminating them.
Shortly after passing the first spring we came in sight of a famous tree, which the Indians reverence as the altar of Walleechu.
Sire," replied the Indian, "I never doubted that a sovereign so wise and accomplished as your Highness would do justice to my horse, when he once knew its power; and I even went so far as to think it probable that you might wish to possess it.
Scenes of drunkeness, brutality, and brawl were the consequence, in the Indian villages and around the trading houses; while bloody feuds took place between rival trading parties when they happened to encounter each other in the lawless depths of the wilderness.
He will stay with us to-night and in the morning go on to the nearest Indian town and come back with porters and helpers.
When it is remembered that the Dutch (who first settled New York), the English, and the French, all gave appellations to the tribes that dwelt within the country which is the scene of this story, and that the Indians not only gave different names to their enemies, but frequently to themselves, the cause of the confusion will be understood.

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