politically correct

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Referring to language reflecting awareness and sensitivity to another person’s physical, mental, cultural, or other disadvantages or deviations from a norm

politically correct

Politically sensitive adjective Referring to language reflecting awareness and sensitivity to another person's physical, mental, cultural, or other disadvantages or deviations from a norm; a person is not mentally retarded, but rather mentally challenged; a person is not obese but rather has an eating disorder, etc
Politically correct-a microglossary
Former term PC term
American Indian Native American
Black African American
Demented Disoriented, severely confused
Handicapped Disadvantaged
Homophobic Heterosexually biased
Housebound Domestic
(American) Indian  Native American
Mentally retarded Mentally disabled or challenged
Obese Large, ample, right-sized
Oriental  Asian
Physically handicapped Physically disadvantaged
Poorly educated Educationally disadvantaged
Racist Culturally insensitive
Stupid Educationally challenged
Politically correct ad absurdum–a microglossary
PCAA term Translation
Colorful Flaky, fruity
Detail oriented  Anal-retentive or, if extreme, obsessive compulsive
Eccentric  Nuts, weird
Enthusiastic & hopeful  Insufferably arrogant
Follicly challenged  Bald
Knowledge deficient Ignorant
Obtunded Stupid
Sexual arts specialist  Prostitute, hooker
Sexual arts aficionado  Slut, sleaze
Vertically challenged Short
Vertically enhanced  Tall
Visually challenged Myopic  
References in classic literature ?
He established schools among them and taught many of the Indians how to read.
One object of Captain Bonneville in wintering among these Indians was to procure a supply of horses against the spring.
A disease, which Captain Bonneville supposed to be pneumonia, now appeared among the Indians, carrying off numbers of them after an illness of three or four days.
On the fourth day, the Indians killed one of our men.--We were busily employed in building this fort, until the fourteenth day of June following, without any farther opposition from the Indians; and having finished the works, I returned to my family, on Clench.
On the twenty-fourth day of December following we had one man killed, and one wounded, by the Indians, who seemed determined to persecute us for erecting this fortification.
The boy said, "It is on the road to this house, and on no other, that the English gentleman will travel to-day." The Indian put a second question--after waiting a little first.
The Indian put a third and last question: "Will the English gentleman come here, as he has promised to come, at the close of day?"
Shortly after passing the first spring we came in sight of a famous tree, which the Indians reverence as the altar of Walleechu.
"Sire," replied the Indian, "I never doubted that a sovereign so wise and accomplished as your Highness would do justice to my horse, when he once knew its power; and I even went so far as to think it probable that you might wish to possess it.
While the chiefs thus revelled in hall, and made the rafters resound with bursts of loyalty and old Scottish songs, chanted in voices cracked and sharpened by the northern blast, their merriment was echoed and prolonged by a mongrel legion of retainers, Canadian voyageurs, half-breeds, Indian hunters, and vagabond hangers-on who feasted sumptuously without on the crumbs that fell from their table, and made the welkin ring with old French ditties, mingled with Indian yelps and yellings.
He will stay with us to-night and in the morning go on to the nearest Indian town and come back with porters and helpers."
When it is remembered that the Dutch (who first settled New York), the English, and the French, all gave appellations to the tribes that dwelt within the country which is the scene of this story, and that the Indians not only gave different names to their enemies, but frequently to themselves, the cause of the confusion will be understood.

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