incubation

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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn),
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions for the purpose of favoring growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Maintenance of an artificial environment for an infant, usually a premature or hypoxic one, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. The development, without sign or symptom, of an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]

incubation

/in·cu·ba·tion/ (in″ku-ba´shun)
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the eggs of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for an infant, especially a premature infant.

incubation

(ĭn′kyə-bā′shən, ĭng′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of incubating.
b. The state of being incubated.
2. Medicine The development of an infection from the time the pathogen enters the body until signs or symptoms first appear.
3. Medicine The maintenance of an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration in order to provide optimal conditions for growth and development.

in′cu·ba′tion·al adj.

incubation

Infectious disease The asymptomatic development of an infection Lab medicine The maintenance of controlled environmental conditions to facilitate growth of microorganisms or cells in culture Neonatology The maintenance of an 'enhanced' environment to optimize growth of a premature or otherwise compromised infant

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Maintaining a controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures.
2. Maintaining an artificial environment for an infant, usually one who is premature or hypoxic, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. Developing, without sign or symptom, an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]

incubation

  1. the process of brooding or incubating in birds.
  2. the period between infection by a pathogen and appearance of disease symptoms.
  3. the maintenance of microbiological cultures at specific temperatures for a given time.

Incubation

The time period between exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus or bacteria, and the appearance of symptoms of illness.
Mentioned in: Hemorrhagic Fevers

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Development, without sign or symptom, of an infection.
[L. incubo, to lie on]

incubation (in″kūbā´shən),

n the maintenance of an ideal environment with regard to temperature, light, air, and humidity in order to foster development of an organism or culture.

incubation

1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. development of a disease by multiplication of an infectious agent within the host.
3. the development of the embryo in the eggs of oviparous animals. See also avian incubation periods.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a neonate, especially a premature one.

artificial incubation
use of a machine which warms, turns, humidifies bird eggs to incubate and eventually hatch them.
incubation behavior
see avian broodiness; almost non-existent in egg-laying birds; persists in meat strains and turkeys.
incubation period
the interval between effective exposure to a pathogenic infectious agent, leading to the invasion of the body and the establishment of the infection, and the appearance of the first clinical signs of the disease in question. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several years, depending on the causative organism and type of disease. See also extrinsic incubation period.
References in periodicals archive ?
coli showed good absorbance even after 24 h of incubation and this capacity increased with increase in incubatory period.
The developing eggs are attached to the pleopods throughout incubation, with an efficient size and shape of the abdomen forming a cover to facilitate fixation and to act as an incubatory chamber.
Larvae of the incubatory oyster Tiostrea chilensis (Bivalvia, Ostreidae) in the plankton of central and southern New Zealand.
Description of a new species of incubatory oyster from northern New Zealand, with notes on its ecology and reproduction.
The non-marsupial demibranchs are not separated, but in the marsupial demibranchs, cyclic changes in the structures of the inner-demibranchs of the gills appear, with the depletion of ripe eggs during incubatory periods and the production of mature and ripe eggs during nonincubatory periods.
In the case of the marsupial demibranchs, the morphologic and structural changes in the inner-demibranchs of the gills showed a distinct seasonal alternation or periodicity in relation to depletion of ripe eggs during the incubatory periods, with the production of mature and ripe eggs during the nonincubatory periods.
Some characteristics of the relationships between the structural changes of the inner-demibranchs in the marsupial gills and gametogenesis in the gonads were found: most gonads became de generate and appeared to be depleted of female and male gametes during the incubatory and larval release periods.
Species belonging to Group 1 are monoecious, viviparous, and incubatory.