incubator

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incubator

 [in´ku-ba″ter]
an apparatus for maintaining optimal conditions for growth and development, such as temperature and humidity, especially one used in the early care of premature infants, or one used for cultures. The primary purpose of the incubator used for preterm newborns is to surround the infant with some of the environmental conditions normally provided in the uterus and necessary until he reaches approximately the level of development of a full-term infant.

The temperature within the incubator is regulated so that the infant's temperature is maintained between 35.5° and 36.6°C (96° to 98°F). Humidity is kept at 50 to 60 per cent unless there is respiratory difficulty, in which case the humidity may be raised as high as 85 to 100 per cent. Oxygen is added in concentrations not exceeding 30 to 40 per cent only as long as the infant is cyanotic because of the danger of retrolental fibroplasia with high concentrations of oxygen.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tor

(in'kyū-bā'tŏr),
1. A container in which controlled environmental conditions may be maintained; for example, for culturing microorganisms.
2. An apparatus for maintaining an infant (usually premature) in an environment of proper oxygenation, humidity, and temperature.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

incubator

(ĭn′kyə-bā′tər, ĭng′-)
n.
1. An apparatus in which environmental conditions, such as temperature and humidity, can be controlled, often used for growing bacterial cultures, hatching eggs artificially, or providing suitable conditions for a chemical or biological reaction.
2. Medicine An apparatus for maintaining an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

incubator

Neonatology A device that maintains 'enhanced' environmental conditions–↑ humidity, O2, temperature, that optimize the growth of a premature or otherwise compromised infant
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·cu·ba·tor

(in'kyū-bā-tŏr)
1. A container in which controlled environmental conditions can be maintained (e.g., for culturing microorganisms).
2. An apparatus for maintaining an infant (usually premature) in an environment of proper oxygenation, humidity, and temperature.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

incubator

An equipment providing a closed controllable environment in which optimum conditions may be established for the nutrition, growth and preservation of organisms, whether bacterial or human. Incubators are used to culture bacteria and to promote the survival of premature babies.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

in·cu·ba·tor

(in'kyū-bā-tŏr)
A container in which controlled environmental conditions can be maintained (e.g., for culturing microorganisms).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Handing over the incubator to officials of the TGH's Neo-Natal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the donation ceremony, the Director of iMEM Foundation, Mrs Comfort Aniagyei, pointed out that the gesture was to ensure that the health facility is best placed to deal with the challenges of infant mortality.
The post Fourth Industrial Revolution startups in Dubai get new incubator appeared first on tahawultech.com.
Started in 2008, Breeze Farm is an incubator program, supported by North Carolina Cooperative Extension and public-private collaborative funding, Breeze Farm provides a place for farm enthusiasts to test out skills and markets.
Conner Forrest provides a good definition of the differences in his 2014 article for TechRepublic: "Accelerators 'accelerate' growth of an existing company, while incubators 'incubate' disruptive ideas with the hope of building out a business model and company." This distinction has implications for the structure of the program, which both Forrest and Hubert Zajicek, in a more recent article for Entrepreneur magazine, elaborate:
LIFTED HIM ECONOMICALLYbrKenter Farm Enterprise makes incubators of different sizes with various egg capacity.
Technology incubators can help offset some of the constraints typically faced by research universities, researchers and high-tech SMEs when they seek to commercialise science and technology knowledge.
KMC is a solution for the defects of preterm incubators, which yields to high disease rates and mortality of preterm infants in hospitals.
In the last decade, a total of 943 small businesses have gotten started in Oklahoma's incubators, according to the Oklahoma Department of Commerce.
He further explained that he used to create incubators using old refrigerators, but stopped as refrigerators were limited in terms of capacity because he had to cut trays according to the size of a fridge.
'It is all a matter of providing them with comprehensive trainings and interactive guidance that are at par with the international and modern standards, and that's how Y-Bizz Incubator comes in.'
Aiming to contribute with new lights to these issues regarding the degree to which incubators fulfill their institutional role, and that they contribute to the local and regional development and the success of new technology based companies (NTBCs), this research aimed to analyze the performance of technology business incubators (TBI) located in Brazil.
"Live Free and Start has helped us get the NH Business Incubator Network reinvigorated, and that helped us with making sure the legislators understood what the incubators are and 'what they're doing in the various geographies we exist in," said AlphaLoft's Kaplan.