incubation period

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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.

period

 [pēr´e-od]
an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
absolute refractory period the part of the refractory period from phase 0 to approximately −60 mV during phase 3; during this time it is impossible for the myocardium to respond with a propagated action potential, even with a strong stimulus. Called also effective refractory period.
blanking period a period of time during and after a pacemaker stimulus when the unstimulated chamber is insensitive to avoid sensing the electronic event in the stimulated chamber.
effective refractory period absolute refractory period.
ejection period the second phase of ventricular systole (0.21 to 0.30 sec), between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, while the blood is discharged into the aorta and pulmonary artery. Called also sphygmic period.
gestation period see gestation period.
incubation period see incubation period.
isoelectric period the moment in muscular contraction when no deflection of the galvanometer is produced.
latency period
latent period a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and the onset of illness (incubation period) or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response (latency, def. 2).
refractory period the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory period), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
relative refractory period the part of the refractory period from approximately −60 mV during phase 3 to the end of phase 3; during this time a depressed response to a strong stimulus is possible.
safe period the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it comprises approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation. See the section on fertility awareness methods, under contraception.
sphygmic period ejection period.
supernormal period in electrocardiography, a period at the end of phase 3 of the action potential during which activation can be initiated with a milder stimulus than is required at maximal repolarization, because at this time the cell is excitable and closer to threshold than at maximal diastolic potential.
vulnerable period that time at the peak of the T wave during which serious arrhythmias are likely to result if a stimulus occurs.
Wenckebach's period a usually repetitive sequence seen in partial heart block, marked by progressive lengthening of the P–R interval; see also dropped beat.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

1. time interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes; Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (2) , latent stage, stage of invasion
2. in a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period

The time elapsed between infection and appearance of disease Sx. Cf Latent period Epidemiology A period of subclinical or inapparent pathologic changes after exposure, ending with the onset of Sx of an infection.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.

incubation period

The interval between the time of infection and the first appearance of symptoms of the resulting disease. Incubation periods vary widely, from as little as a few hours in the case of CHOLERA to many weeks in some cases of RABIES.

Incubation period

The interval from initial exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus, and the first symptoms of illness.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.
References in periodicals archive ?
arlettae were 38.8[degrees]C, oil concentration 10.2%, inoculum volume 9.3%, pH 7.32, and incubation time 3 h for obtaining a maximum lipase activity of 6.45 U/mL.
Therefore, the MRI detection limits are as low as 250.000 cells when using full USPIO dose and 21 hours of incubation time. For cells labeled with lower USPIO dose and lower incubation times, no significant difference was detected on MRI compared to unlabeled cells, and the detection limits for cells labeled using these conditions will therefore be at least several million cells.
It was observed that treatments with high incubation time produced high colour concentration.
It is assumed that the crystallisation rate of crystals is linked with incubation times in time-temperature-transformation diagrams (TTT diagrams).
The decrease in AVS with incubation time was followed by a progressive increase of sulfate concentrations in samples from water column and sediment pore water.
As one would expect, the separation boundary between the lowest normal spot and the highest affected spot also scales linearly with the activity, thus increasing the tolerance for discrimination between normal and affected spots on the digital microfluidic cartridge, despite the reduced incubation time of 6 h and DBS extract sample volume of only 0.3 [micro]L.
The GPC curves and change of [M.sub.n] of PCL with incubation time are shown in Fig.
Figure 4 represents the viability of HepG2 cancer cell lines as a function of light dose at two concentrations 25 and 30 [micro]g/ml with 6 hours incubation time. There was a gradual decreasing of the viability by the increasing of light dose but this decreasing of viability is not steep.
However, the incubation time was adjusted to 0hr, 2hrs, 3hrs, 4hrs and 6hrs.
Results from laboratory rearing experiments were used to develop parameters for an incubation model to determine how Atka mackerel incubation time varies between nesting sites.