chirality

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chirality

 [ki-ral´ĭ-te]
the property of handedness, of not being superimposable on a mirror image; the handedness of an asymmetric molecule, as specified by its optical rotation or absolute configuration.

chi·ral·i·ty

(kī-ral'i-tē),
The property of nonidentity of an object with its mirror image; used in chemistry with respect to stereochemical isomers.
[G. cheir, hand]

chirality

(kī-răl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The aspect of a structure or property, such as the configuration of a molecule or the spin of a particle, that renders that structure or property distinguishable from its mirror image or symmetrical opposite. Also called handedness.
The left- or right-sidedness of virtually the entirety of the physical universe, from elementary particles—e.g., electrons and molecules—to highly complex organisms
Organic chemistry The 3-D conformation of a molecule, which has an either left-handed (levo- or l-) orientation, as do most molecules in functioning biologic systems, or right-handed (dextro- or d-) orientation

chi·ral·i·ty

(kī-ral'i-tē)
The property of nonidentity of an object with its mirror image; used in chemistry with respect to stereochemical isomers.
[G. cheir, hand]

chirality

The state of two molecules having identical structure except that they display ‘handedness’ (as in the right and left hand) and are mirror images of one another. Such pairs of molecules are also known as enantiomers or optical isomers. When dissolved in a fluid they rotate a plane-polarized beam in opposite directions.

chirality

(of STEREOISOMERS) the property of ‘handedness’ (right- or left-handedness) of a molecule, such that the mirror image cannot coincide exactly with the actual image.
References in periodicals archive ?
The symmetry of illusion characteristic of the Antinomy "disorients,"(58) reverses "analogously" to the paradox of incongruent counterparts. Dogmatisms |Pi^|Alpha^|Rho^|Alpha^ |Delta^|Omicron^|Xi^|Alpha^ are irretrievably lost.
In "Mochlos ou le conflit des facultes" Derrida briefly mentions the paradox of incongruent counterparts, only to end by quoting a footnote from Kant's The Contest of Faculties on the asymmetry of feet in general and of those of Prussian infantrymen in particular.
Kreimendahl sees the ultimate cause of the Critical turn in Hume's influence on Kant's understanding of the Antinomy of Reason--a claim made plausible by the recent rediscovery of Hamann's Hume translation--and largely ignores the paradox of incongruent counterparts. He not only overlooks, however, the close connection between the paradox and the antinomy, but also the fact that Kant's own acknowledgment of his indebtedness to Hume already involves the problem of orientation: "My remembering David Hume was the very thing which many years ago first interrupted my dogmatic slumber and gave my investigations in the field of speculative philosophy a quite new direction" (Prolegomena, AA IV, 260).
Josef Schmucker ("Was entzundete in Kant das grosse Licht von 1769?" Archiv fur Geschichte der Philosophie 58 |1976^, 393-434) places greater emphasis on the role of incongruent counterparts. For a more detailed discussion of the relation of the development of Kant's metaphysics of space to the problem of synthetic judgments a priori, the key question of the Critique, see Ted B.