incidentaloma

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in·ci·dent·a·lo·ma

(in'sĭ-dent'ă-lō'mă),
Mass lesion, usually of the adrenal gland, serendipitously noted during computed tomographic examinations performed for other reasons.
[incidental + -oma, tumor]
A mass or lesion unexpectedly identified during a routine physical exam, imaging procedure—CT, MRI, ultrasound or other—or surgical exploration.
Sites Endocrine—adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid—kidney, lung

incidentaloma

Medtalk An incidentally discovered mass or lesion, detected by CT, MRI, or other imaging modality performed for an unrelated reason. See Pathologist's tumor. Cf Ulysses syndrome.

in·ci·dent·a·lo·ma

(in'si-den'tă-lō'mă)
Mass lesion, noted fortuitously during computed tomographic examinations performed for other reasons.
[incidental + -oma, tumor]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, the widely accepted part is represented by incidental finding.
Both ACMG and the Association of Molecular Pathology have published guidelines for reporting additional incidental findings.
Incidental findings in healthy volunteers during research procedure are common.
Peritoneal loose bodies are usually asymptomatic and present as incidental findings during surgery or post mortem.
The explosive growth in the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the pre- and postoperative evaluations of patients with cholesteatoma has led to a concomitant increase in the number of incidental findings in this population.
The sheer number of tests ordered can lead to incidental findings that result in unnecessary follow-up testing and potentially harmful interventions.
Benign isolated coronary anomalies are often incidental findings during diagnostic imaging modalities and autopsies.
MCTLMPs are most often incidental findings, although patients may present with an abdominal mass, pain, mucusuria, hematuria, urgency, or umbilical discharge.
Increase your knowledge of incidental findings and how to manage them.
However, population based studies using magnetic resonance imaging show that incidental findings of such lesions are also very common among people without knee symptoms and among those without plain radiographic signs of osteoarthritis, suggesting that the clinical significance of such findings is unclear.
WGS/WES can also reveal secondary or incidental findings, posing dilemmas.
Incidental findings and ancillary-care obligations.