incidentaloma

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in·ci·dent·a·lo·ma

(in'sĭ-dent'ă-lō'mă),
Mass lesion, usually of the adrenal gland, serendipitously noted during computed tomographic examinations performed for other reasons.
[incidental + -oma, tumor]
A mass or lesion unexpectedly identified during a routine physical exam, imaging procedure—CT, MRI, ultrasound or other—or surgical exploration.
Sites Endocrine—adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid—kidney, lung

incidentaloma

Medtalk An incidentally discovered mass or lesion, detected by CT, MRI, or other imaging modality performed for an unrelated reason. See Pathologist's tumor. Cf Ulysses syndrome.

in·ci·dent·a·lo·ma

(in'si-den'tă-lō'mă)
Mass lesion, noted fortuitously during computed tomographic examinations performed for other reasons.
[incidental + -oma, tumor]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Incidental findings during head and neck MRI screening in 1717 patients with temporomandibular disorders.
Similarly, commentators use the phrase "incidental findings"
Managing incidental findings on abdominal CT: white paper of the ACR incidental findings committee.
In conclusion, with mpMRI becoming more common in the setting of prostate cancer diagnosis and management, physicians should be aware of incidental findings to provide early intervention for asymptomatic patients with undetected bladder cancer prior to disease progression.
We reported a case of double RCA from a single ostium in a 68-year-old male as an incidental finding in CAG.
"It should be ensured that radiology are summarising any significant incidental findings at the end of a scan report, as per the requirements of a previous audit, and that these findings are brought to the attention of relevant staff in a timely manner."
Adults with malrotation are usually asymptomatic and generally have incidental findings when imaged for other indications.
However, this has led to inconsistencies regarding next steps and discussion of whether there is clinical utility in disclosing incidental findings. In a survey of over 300 genetic counselors, 95% were aware that NIPT could detect maternal cancer (13).
As access and accuracy have increased, there has been a steady rise in the popularity amongst ordering physicians [1-3], as well as the number of incidental findings made by CTPA [1, 3].
Specialists working in epidemiology, child health, and other fields in Europe and Pakistan consider ethical aspects, epidemiological studies of child maltreatment, genetic testing legislation, dealing with incidental findings, conducting research in developing countries, recruiting a representative sample, the epidemiology of global child health, dealing with proxy-reports, developmental aspects of growth and body functions in children and young adults, basic epidemiology, and dealing with confounding variables.