dysphagia

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dysphagia

 [dis-fa´jah]
difficulty in swallowing; see also aphagia. There are numerous underlying causes, including stroke and other neurologic conditions, local trauma and muscle damage, and a tumor or swelling that partially obstructs the passage of food. The condition can range from mild discomfort, such as a feeling that there is a lump in the throat, to a severe inability to control the muscles needed for chewing and swallowing.

Dysphagia can seriously compromise the nutritional status of a patient. Temporary measures such as tube feeding and parenteral nutrition can remedy the immediate problem, but long-term goals for rehabilitation must focus on helping the patient recover the ability to swallow sufficient amounts of food and drink to assure adequate nutrition.

Measures intended to accomplish the goal of oral feeding are implemented only after determining the particular techniques that are most helpful for the individual patient. In general, placing the patient in an upright position, providing a pleasant and calm environment, being sure the lips are closed as the patient begins to swallow, and preparing and serving foods of the proper consistency are all helpful techniques. Stroke victims who have difficulty swallowing should be turned, or should turn their heads, to the unaffected side to facilitate swallowing. If dry mouth is a problem, there are artificial salivas available to moisten and lubricate the mouth. When drinking fluids, dysphagic patients should sip the liquid in small amounts.
esophageal dysphagia dysphagia caused by an abnormality in the esophagus, such as a smooth muscle disorder that interferes with peristalsis or an obstruction from external compression or a stricture.
oropharyngeal dysphagia dysphagia caused by difficulty in initiating the swallowing process, so that solids and liquids cannot move out of the mouth properly.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē),
Difficulty in swallowing.
See also: aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

(dĭs-fā′jə, -jē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in swallowing.

dys·phag′ic (-făj′ĭk) adj.

dysphagia

Internal medicine Difficulty or inability to swallow, a finding that may indicate a brainstem tumor. See Malignant dysphagia. Cf Deglutition.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

Difficulty in swallowing. See also PHARYNGEAL POUCH, ACHALASIA and GLOBUS HYSTERICUS.

Dysphagia

Medical term for any difficulty, discomfort or pain when swallowing

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

Patient discussion about dysphagia

Q. mouth ulcer and difficulty to swallow, below right side of inner tongue guggle salt water and vinigar dose'nt help

A. how big is it? mouth ulcers has a reason why they happen. sometimes a broken tooth, biting a sharp metal, a prosthetic that doesn't sit well..that sort of things. but sometimes it is caused by other stuff. any way, oral hygiene may relieve some of the symptoms. Topical (rubbed on) antihistamines, antacids, corticosteroids, or other soothing preparations may be recommended for applying on top of the ulcer. Avoid hot or spicy foods.

More discussions about dysphagia
References in periodicals archive ?
Two days later he was brought to the emergency department with worsening symptoms, including constipation and inability to eat or sleep because of his abdominal pain.
Here we go again indeed - five months of betting shop staff moaning about their inability to eat, drink and have a social life.
"Despite the panic and inability to eat beforehand, I decided afterwards that I liked doing this so, five years later, here I am, loving it and still panicking."
The SCARED event frequency score was calculated by asking caregivers how often they experienced 10 potentially distressing events affecting their patients-including severe pain or discomfort, inability to eat or swallow, and falling-and how frightening each experience was for the caregiver.
He repeatedly advised the patient not to seek emergency care despite her complaints of extreme pain, nausea, weakness, and inability to eat. The patient eventually sought emergency treatment on her own and, after undergoing emergency surgery, was hospitalized for 18 days with life-threatening intestinal injuries, including peritonitis.
Researchers identified several acute clinical issues that could cause complications for patients recovering from hip fractures, including abnormal vital signs, mental confusion, heart or lung problems, and an inability to eat. The researchers also found that time spent in a post-acute care facility, such as a rehabilitation hospital or skilled nursing home, did not eliminate the risks associated with early discharge.
Some dancers report an inability to eat during intense performance schedules.
Ten year old Quinn comes to your office with his mother complaining of a 3-day history of fever, sore throat, foul smelling drooling, and the inability to eat or drink.
Little Annie Jones is painfully underweight as a direct result of a psychological inability to eat and retain food, which began when she was only three months old.
They commented on my sunken facial features, my lack of energy, and my inability to eat unless forced.
But many infants still endure terrible withdrawal symptoms, including fits where they stop breathing and turn blue, constant vomiting, diarrhoea, and inability to eat.
* aware of how your life may change after the operation (adjustment to the side effects of the surgery, Including need to chew well and inability to eat large meals)?