impulse-control disorder

impulse-control disorder

A disorder marked by failure to resist impulses, drives, or temptations that may potentially cause harm. Impulse-control disorders include kleptomania, pyromania, pathological gambling, trichotillomania, and intermittent explosive disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most researchers, however, view compulsive buying as an impulse-control disorder that relates to other types of impulse-control disorders, such as binge-eating and alcoholism (e.g., Faber et al.
Trich is an impulse-control disorder and those with it pull out their own hair - be it from the scalp, eyelashes, eyebrows - or any other part of the body.
Individuals with this impulse-control disorder typically deny hair-pulling, said Dr.
He'd also been battling alcoholism, cocaine abuse, an impulse-control disorder, stress and an anti-social personality, court documents revealed.
By DSM-IV criteria, it is an impulse-control disorder. If it persists, it may be symptomatic of various psychiatric disorders, including retardation, schizophrenia, severe depression, borderline personality disorder, behavior disorder, and psychoneurosis.
This section also discusses the categorization of pathological gambling and how, rather than being categorized as a single disorder, it shares important features with disorders such as obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, affective spectrum disorders, addiction, and impulse-control disorder.
The current DSM-IV-TR diagnoses that are most related to SIB are stereotypic movement disorder with self-injurious behavior, trichotillomania, impulse-control disorder not otherwise specified (NOS), and BPD.
Pathological gambling is defined by the American Psychiatric Association as an impulse-control disorder with symptoms similar to those of drug and alcohol addiction.
TWENTY compulsive net surfers were tested by doctors at the University of Florida (where else?) and all 20 turned out to have mental illnesses including manic depression, impulse-control disorder and a range of psychotic disorders.
Thirty of the study subjects (60%) reported having at least one clinically important comorbid disorder, such as major depressive disorder; an anxiety disorder; another impulse-control disorder, such as skin picking or nail biting; or an eating disorder.