impact factor

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impact factor

mathematical expression of frequency with which a given medical journal's original articles are cited in other medical journals.

im·pact fac·tor

(im'pakt fak'tŏr)
Mathematic expression of frequency with which a particular medical journal's original articles are cited in other medical journals.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have general agreement that ASABE journals have low impact factors and long review times before publishing.
Impact factors and publication counts provide objective measures of the respective rigor of each research day event with both schools employing a peer-review process.
An impact factors means that the journal is respected by scientific community and highly subscribed"
Some discuss misleading metrics and impact factors and provide lists of known bogus metrics (Jalalian and Mahboobi, 2013; Jalalian, 2013; Gutierrez et al.
Professor Adegoke has successfully supervised 14 PhD students and has over 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals with reasonable impact factors.
Large increases and decreases in journal impact factors in only one year: The effect of journal self-citations.
Certainly impact factors are important, but so is an awareness of who we are as a profession from the research perspective.
For all 22 individual years (1992-2013), predicted impact factors were calculated.
Authors (even those supportive of open access publishing) are sensitive to journal Impact Factors, so a drop in PLOS ONE'S Impact Factor (from 4.
Editors of such individual journals and managers of publication houses advertise their journals on the basis of impact factors considering it as valid measure of quality of the journal.
Some of his ideas for doing this include: 1) academics who serve a role in research assessment should shun all use of journal names and impact factors as a measure of quality; 2) researchers applying for positions, funding and tenure should avoid any mention of impact factors; 3) funders, universities and other institutions should make it clear to their review committees that journal brand cannot be used as a proxy for scientific quality; and 4) those in the appropriate position should insist that journals stop promoting impact factors.