feline immunodeficiency virus

(redirected from Immunodeficiency virus, feline)

feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV),

a slow viral disease of Felidae with worldwide distribution; characterized by chronic immunosuppression and development of secondary opportunist infections and cancers. Primary route of transmission is through bite wounds, but transplacental and nursing transfer are other routes of transmission. In this species, sexual contact is not considered an important transfer route. Species-specific strain; does not cause disease in humans. Other important viruses in the genus include agents of progressive pneumonia in sheep, infectious anemia in horses (EIA), and arthritis-encephalitis in goats. FIV used as a model for human AIDS (HIV) research. Clinical signs variable and often relate to secondary invaders; fever, anorexia, gingivitis, stomatitis, poor haircoat, diarrhea, anemia, lymphopenia (CD4+:CD8+ ratio used as a prognostic parameter); bladder and respiratory infections are common signs. May cause seizures, abortions, and many cats remain asymptomatic until late stage disease. Licensed vaccine available. Feline leukemia virus, another common slow virus disease of cats is also in the Retroviridae family.
Synonym(s): cat AIDS, feline AIDS
References in periodicals archive ?
It can occur after an infection by disease such as the feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, feline infectious peritonitis and the protozoal disease toxoplasmosis.
Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats.
[7] DANNER, R.; GOLTZ, D.; HESS, S.; BANKO, P Evidence of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus, Feline Leukemia Virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in Feral Cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.
Feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus and Bartonella species in stray cats on St Kitts, West Indies.
P Dubey, "Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., Feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in egyptian cats," Journal of Parasitology, vol.

Full browser ?