immunosuppression

(redirected from Immune suppression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

immunosuppression

 [im″u-no-sŭ-presh´un]
inhibition of the immune response to unfamiliar antigens that may be present; used in transplantation procedures to prevent rejection of the transplant or graft, and in autoimmune disease, allergy, multiple myeloma, and other conditions.

im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion

(im'yū-nō-sū-presh'ŭn),
Prevention or interference with the development of immunologic response; may reflect natural immunologic unresponsiveness (tolerance), may be artificially induced by chemical, biologic, or physical agents, or may be caused by disease.

immunosuppression

/im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion/ (-sah-presh´un) prevention or diminution of the immune response, such as by radiation, antimetabolites, or specific antibody.immunosuppres´sive

immunosuppression

(ĭm′yə-nō-sə-prĕsh′ən, ĭ-myo͞o′-)
n.
Suppression of the immune response, as by drugs or radiation, in order to prevent the rejection of grafts or transplants or to control autoimmune diseases. Also called immunodepression.

im′mu·no·sup·pres′sant (-prĕs′ənt) n.
im′mu·no·sup·pressed′ (-prĕst′) adj.
im′mu·no·sup·pres′sive adj.

immunosuppression

[-səpresh′ən]
Etymology: L, immunis + supprimere, to press down
1 the administration of agents that significantly interfere with the ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic stimulation by inhibiting cellular and humoral immunity. Corticosteroids; cytotoxic drugs, including antimetabolites and alkylating agents; antilymphocytic antibodies; and irradiation may produce immunosuppression. Immunosuppression may be deliberate, such as in preparation for bone marrow or other transplantation to prevent rejection by the host of the donor tissue, or incidental, such as often results from chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer.
2 an abnormal condition of the immune system characterized by markedly inhibited ability to respond to antigenic stimuli. immunosuppressed, adj.

Immunosuppression

Techniques to prevent transplant graft rejection by the body's immune system.

im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion

(im'yū-nō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
Prevention or interference with the development of immunologic response; may reflect natural immunologic unresponsiveness, may be artificially induced by chemical, biologic, or physical agents, or caused by disease.

immunosuppression

diminished immune responsiveness; may occur following certain infections, notably viral infections such as retroviruses or herpesviruses (cytamegaloviruses), exposure to x-irradiation or toxic chemicals or be deliberately produced in transplantation patients by drugs or antilymphocyte serum.

therapeutic immunosuppression
treatment which suppresses immune function where it is contributing to the disease process. Includes immune-mediated diseases of the eye, hemopoietic system, skin, kidney and central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in general, the new immune suppression findings suggest an evolutionary trade-off with big returns.
Immunologically, 9 (21%) were not immune-suppressed, 10 (24%) had moderate immune suppression, and 20 (48%) were severely immune-suppressed (CD4 % results of 3 unrecorded).
Our research paves the way for a new approach to treating diabetes, one that features a virtually unlimited supply of islets and no need for immune suppression.
The goal is to determine the safety and tolerability of 0, 6 and 12 weeks of post-transplant systemic immune suppression.
Short-term diabetes treatment that achieves lasting immune suppression could overcome that problem, yon Herrath says.
There was no correlation of DNA content to survival period without immune suppression medication.
The larger Ebola protein does not appear to play a role in immune suppression.
This is a highly specific immune suppression," says study author Richard C.