immune response

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immune

 [ĭ-mūn´]
1. being highly resistant to a disease because of the formation of humoral antibodies or the development of immunologically competent cells, or both, or as a result of some other mechanism, as interferon activities in viral infections.
2. characterized by the development of humoral antibodies or cellular immunity, or both, following antigenic challenge.
3. produced in response to antigenic challenge, as immune serum globulin.
immune response the reaction to and interaction with substances interpreted by the body as not-self, the result being humoral and cellular immunity. Called also immune reaction. The immune response depends on a functioning thymus and the conversion of stem cells to B and T lymphocytes. These lymphocytes contribute to antibody production, cellular immunity, and immunologic memory.
Disorders of the Immune Response. Pathologic conditions associated with an abnormal immune response (immunopathy) may result from (1) immunodepression, that is, an absent or deficient supply of the components of either humoral or cellular immunity, or both; (2) excessive production of gamma globulins; (3) overreaction to antigens of extrinsic origin, that is, antigens from outside the body; and (4) abnormal response of the body to its own cells and tissues.

Those conditions arising from immunosuppression include agammaglobulinemia (absence of gamma globulins) and hypogammaglobulinemia (a decrease of circulating antibodies). Factors that may cause or contribute to suppression of the immune response include (1) congenital absence of the thymus or of the stem cells that are precursors of B and T lymphocytes; (2) malnutrition, in which there is a deficiency of the specific nutrients essential to the life of antibody-synthesizing cells; (3) cancer, viral infections, and extensive burns, all of which overburden the immune response mechanisms and rapidly deplete the supply of antigen-specific antibody; (4) certain drugs, including alcohol and heroin, some antibiotics, antipsychotics, and the antineoplastics used in the treatment of cancer.

Overproduction of gamma globulins is manifested by an excessive proliferation of plasma cells (multiple myeloma). hypersensitivity is the result of an overreaction to substances entering the body. Examples of this kind of inappropriate immune response include hay fever, drug and food allergies, extrinsic asthma, serum sickness, and anaphylaxis.

Autoimmune diseases are manifestations of the body's abnormal response to and inability to tolerate its own cells and tissues. For reasons not yet fully understood, the body fails to interpret its own cells as self and, as it would with other foreign (not-self) substances, utilizes antibodies and immunologically competent cells to destroy and contain them.
immune system a complex system of cellular and molecular components whose primary function is distinguishing self from nonself and defense against foreign organisms or substances; see also immune response. The primary cellular components are lymphocytes and macrophages, and the primary molecular components are antibodies and lymphokines; granulocytes and the complement system are also involved in immune responses but are not always considered part of the immune system per se.
Major organs and tissues of the immune system in the child. From McKinney et al., 2000.
immune complex disease local or systemic disease caused by the formation of circulating antibody-antigen immune complexes and their deposition in tissue, due to activation of complement and to recruitment and activation of leukocytes in type III hypersensitivity reactions.

response

 [re-spons´]
any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.
acute phase response a group of physiologic processes occurring soon after the onset of infection, trauma, inflammatory processes, and some malignant conditions. The most prominent change is a dramatic increase of acute phase proteins in the serum, especially C-reactive protein. Also seen are fever, increased vascular permeability, and a variety of metabolic and pathologic changes.
anamnestic response the rapid reappearance of antibody in the blood following introduction of an antigen to which the subject had previously developed a primary immune response.
auditory brainstem response ABR; a special hearing test that tracks the nerve signals arising in the inner ear as they travel along the auditory nerve to the brain region responsible for hearing. A small speaker placed near the ear makes a clicking sound, and special electrodes record the nerve signal as it travels. The test can determine where along the nerve there is a lesion responsible for sensorineural hearing loss. It is often used for individuals with such loss in just one ear; this is often caused by a benign tumor along the auditory nerve, but if the ABR reading is normal in a given region, the chances of there being a tumor there are small. This test can also be used on infants since it requires no conscious response from the person being tested.
autoimmune response the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues. See also autoimmune disease.
conditioned response see conditioned response.
dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response a nursing diagnosis adopted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of a patient to adjust to lowered levels of mechanical ventilator support, which interrupts and prolongs the process of weaning. See also mechanical ventilatory weaning.
galvanic skin response the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response see immune response.
inflammatory response the various changes that tissue undergoes when it becomes inflamed; see inflammation.
post-trauma response former name for the nursing diagnosis post-trauma syndrome.
reticulocyte response increase in the formation of reticulocytes in response to a bone marrow stimulus.
triple response (of Lewis) a physiologic reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response an unlearned response, i.e., one that occurs naturally, in contrast to a conditioned response.

im·mune re·sponse

1. any response of the immune system to an antigen including antibody production and/or cell-mediated immunity;
2. the response of the immune system to an antigen (immunogen) that leads to the condition of induced sensitivity; the immune response to the initial antigenic exposure (primary immune response) is detectable, as a rule, only after a lag period of from several days to 2 weeks; the immune response to a subsequent stimulus (secondary immune response) by the same antigen is more rapid than in the case of the primary immune response.

immune response

n.
An integrated bodily response to an antigen, especially one mediated by lymphocytes and involving recognition of antigens by specific antibodies or previously sensitized lymphocytes.

immune response

a defense function of the body that protects the body against invading pathogens, foreign tissues, and malignancies. It consists of the humoral immune response and the cell-mediated immune response. In the humoral immune response, B lymphocytes produce antibodies that react with specific antigens. The antigen-antibody reactions activate the complement cascade, which causes the lysis of cells bearing those antigens. The humoral response may begin immediately on invasion by an antigen or up to 48 hours later. In the cell-mediated immune response, T lymphocytes mobilize tissue macrophages in the presence of foreign antigens. Also called immune reaction. See also humoral immunity, immune system.

immune response

Immunology The constellation of responses of the immune system to foreign antigenic stimuli

im·mune re·sponse

(i-myūn' rĕ-spons')
1. Any response of the immune system to an antigen including antibody production or cell-mediated immunity.
2. The response of the immune system to an antigen (immunogen) that leads to the condition of induced sensitivity; the immune response to the initial antigenic exposure (primary immune response) is detectable, as a rule, only after a lag period of from several days to 2 weeks; the immune response to a subsequent stimulus (secondary immune response) by the same antigen is more rapid than in the case of the primary immune response.

immune response

an antagonistic and specific host reaction in response to foreign ANTIGENS, involving the formation of ANTIBODIES by B-CELLS (or a cell-mediated response by T-CELLS). When such antibodies are present in the body, the individual is said to possess IMMUNITY against the specific antigen that stimulated the antibody production. The immune response is a vital defence mechanism but creates severe problems with the transplant of organs, such as kidneys, from donors. In these cases the tissues are ‘matched’ for tissue compatibility and the recipient treated with chemicals that reduce the immune response.

Immune response

A response from the body to an antigen that occurs when the antigen is identified as foreign and that induces the production of antibodies and lymphocytes capable of destroying the antigen or making it harmless.

immune

1. being highly resistant to a disease because of the formation of humoral antibodies or the development of immunologically competent cells, or both, or as a result of some other mechanism, such as interferon activities in viral infections.
2. characterized by the development of antibodies or cellular immunity, or both, following exposure to antigen.
3. produced in response to antigen, such as immune serum globulin. The essential feature of antibody and cell-mediated immunity is that they are highly antigen specific.

immune adherence
the binding of antibody-antigen-complement complexes to complement receptors found on red blood cells.
immune complex
see antibody-antigen complex.
immune complex disease
disease induced by the deposition of or association with antigen-antibody-complement complexes in the microvasculature of tissues. Fixation of complement component C3 by the complexes initiates inflammation. See also serum sickness, hypersensitivity.
immune complex reaction
type III hypersensitivity (1).
immune deficiency disease
one in which animals have inadequate immune responses and so are more susceptible to infectious disease. The defect may be primary (inherited), or secondary (acquired) which usually develops after birth because of toxins or infectious agents. See also combined immune deficiency syndrome, hypogammaglobulinemia, agammaglobulinemia, inherited parakeratosis, chediak-higashi syndrome and canine granulocytopathy syndrome.
immune hemolysis
see immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (below).
immune interferon
immune modulator
immune reaction
immune response.
immune reaction fever
aseptic fever occurring in anaphylaxis, angioedema.
immune response
the specific response to substances interpreted by the body as not-self, the result being humoral and cellular immunity. The immune response depends on a functioning thymus and the conversion of stem cells to B and T lymphocytes. These B and T lymphocytes contribute to antibody production, cellular immunity and immunological memory. See also humoral immunity.
immune response (Ir) genes
see immune response genes.
immune surveillance
the detection by lymphocytes, especially T lymphocytes, of new antigens, particularly on tumor cells.
immune system
consists of the primary lymphoid organs (thymus and Bursa of Fabricius or its equivalent (bone marrow) in mammals) and secondary lymphoid organs (lymph nodes, spleen and other lymphoid tissue).
immune tolerance
see immunological tolerance.

response

any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.

autoimmune response
the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues.
conditioned response
see also conditioned response, conditioning.
dazzle response
shining a bright light in the eye causes a blink. Called also dazzle reflex.
galvanic skin response
the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response
specifically altered reactivity of the animal body after exposure to antigen, manifested as antibody-production, cell-mediated immunity, development of hypersensitivity, or as immunological tolerance. Called also immune reaction. See also immune response.
maze response
a test of vision for animals.
placing response
see placing reflex.
response rate
in surveys, the number of completed survey instruments (questionnaires, interview records) divided by the total number of persons approached.
response trial
a field trial conducted to test a hypothesis, often about the cause of a disease but can encompass therapeutics or control of a disease. The hypothesis is tested by observing the response to an alteration in the system, e.g. in feeding or in management.
triple response (of Lewis)
a physiological reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response
an unlearned response, i.e. one that occurs naturally. See also conditioning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Appropriate areas of research include, but are not limited to: 1) Characterization of host cells involved in the innate immune response to protozoa; 2) Identification of novel pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition receptors on host cells; 3) Characterization of mediators of innate immunity that are produced by host cells stimulated by protozoa; 4) Elucidation of the intracellular signaling pathways in the mammalian innate immune cells that are stimulated by protozoa; 5) Comparison of human versus animal model molecular responses to protozoan pathogens or their components; 6) Human or animal model gene mutations or polymorphisms associated with distinctive innate immune responses to protozoa.
IR103 is composed of two agents, the HIV-1 Immunogen from The Immune Response Corporation, and AMPLIVAX, a second generation CpG DNA immunostimulatory adjuvant that we recently licensed from Hybridon," noted John N.
And in these animals that do get sick, low viral loads and strong cellular immune responses predict slower disease progression--as they do in humans with AIDS.
For example, if reducing immune activation during the first stages of infection improves survival, why do known long-term survivors of HIV have higher-than-normal overall immune responses to the virus?
In the Stanford study, injection of the combined preparation generated a more robust immune response than possible from injection of just the cancer-associated protein.
Each virus has a certain fitness, and the dynamics of the host immune response ensure that the virus needs to keep "moving.
Instead, why not hook the key proteins needed for an immune response to something else?
are capable of stimulating mucosal immune responses and that intranasal immunization with SIV VLPs and SHIV VLPs can induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses.
Richard Williams, CEO of Norwood Immunology, commented: "Given the potential role of virosomes in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and their ability to achieve enhanced immune responses, we believe that the potential applications for this technology are significant.
Several years ago, Perelson met with Kauffman -- who with others had already begun developing a general theory of adaptive walks on rugged landscapes -- and suggested that the maturation of the immune response might be a phenomenon perfectly suited to honing the theory and getting clues to a fitness landscape's specific ups and downs.
The Phase I clinical trial is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation safety study that also monitors immune responses to the product candidate.
Adjuvant: a substance that improves the immune response to an antigen (see below).