immigration

(redirected from Immigrant language)
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immigration

the movement of organisms into a specific area. Compare EMIGRATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The exact requirements of Taiwan's new immigrant language teacher labor force will be fully understood after surveys are carried out next year.
A case in which a minority and immigrant language seems to enjoy positive attitudes can be seen in Jansen's (2013) study investigating Haitian immigration to the bateyes of the Dominican Republic.
Immigrant Language Proficiency, Earnings, and Language Policies.
Chapter two explores how initial language tolerance at the birth of the American nation was soon supplanted with suspicion of immigrant languages. US society on the verge of World War I conflated speaking English with loyalty.
These studies have played an invaluable role in placing the issue of immigrant language barriers at the center of research and policy debates on welfare-to-work issues.
This study of immigrant language skills used data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia, which followed a cohort of settler arrivals for the first 3.5 years of their residence in Australia, surveying them at three points in time.
Follow-up interviews were held with 19 of these companies, selected on the basis of demonstrating innovative ways of using immigrant language resources, to obtain best practice data.
Yiddish has shifted from a Jewish immigrant language to a Jewish heritage and ethnic language within the rubric of Canadian multiculturalism.
Gendered identities and immigrant language learning.
It describes language demography, discusses school enrollment trends among minority and immigrant language speakers, and notes the official status of languages in the United States, explaining that even though there is not an official, national, or constitutional U.S.
For students and researchers interested in promoting educational equity and achievement for immigrant language minority students.
Notwithstanding the merits of the conventional method of studying the ethnic economy, this paper offers an alternative view of the ethnic enclave as a specialized consumer market in which ethnic or immigrant consumers patronize a lingustically-specific market in which products and services are advertised in an immigrant language, and transactions take place in concentrated ethnic business locations where an immigrant language is typically used in transactions, or in nonimmigrant owned firms which offer services in an immigrant language.

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