ginger

(redirected from Imber)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

gin·ger

(jin'jĕr),
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale (family Zingiberaceae), known in commerce as Jamaica ginger, African ginger, and Cochin ginger The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent.
Synonym(s): zingiber
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ginger

A deciduous plant rich in volatile oil, with borneol, camphene, cineol, citral, gingerols, shogaols, zingerones (phenylalkylketones) and phelandrene.
 
Alternative nutrition
Ginger has a long tradition as a health food, and its various uses include: as a digestive aid; to prevent nausea due to motion sickness, morning sickness or chemotherapy; for cardiovascular disease, as ginger reduces cholesterol; and it may be useful in preventing cancer.
 
Chinese medicine
Ginger is a fixture in Chinese herbal medicine: the rhizomes are antiemetic, cardiotonic, carminative, rubifacient and stimulate secretion, and it is used to treat abdominal pain, burns, colds, hangovers, hypercholesterolaemia, motion sickness, pancreatitis, Raynaud phenomenon, nausea, seafood intoxication and vomiting.

Herbal medicine
Ginger has been used in Western herbal medicine for arthritic pain, earache, gout, headache, kidney conditions, menstrual cramping, motion sickness, sinusitis and vertigo.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

gin·ger

(jin'jĕr)
The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale, known in commerce as Jamaica ginger, African ginger, and Cochin ginger. The outer cortical layers are often either partially or completely removed; used as a carminative and flavoring agent.
[L. zingiber]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
1."Imber Nocturnus." X; [D.sub.4]-[G.sub.5]; Tess: mH; 5/4, 4/4, 2/4, 3/4, [quarter note] = 52; V/M, C/mD; pages.
Imber was born in Galicia in 1855, the son of a poor Orthodox family.
The story of Imber's relationship with the Oliphants is one of six narratives that make up Shalom Goldman's groundbreaking monograph on "the Christian involvement with Zionism" (1).
Like many modern narratives interested in utopian communities, Iris Murdoch's 1958 novel The Bell, which traces the last months of the short-lived "Imber Court," is all about work: who works, who doesn't, what constitutes "real work," what work transcends mere "busi-ness" to become "'vocation"--Imber Court being, after all, a secular community adjacent to a religion one, Imber Abbey.' The novel, written during the period of Murdoch's particular interest in Sartrean existentialism, explores the doomed fragility, in an environment of modern skepticism, of any effort to endorse individual salvation through faith and good works.
A paradox for school leaders, for example, is to maintain the status quo and educate for a complex society in order to serve a diverse clientele equitably (Dantley, 1990; Gallimore, 1989; Scheurich & Imber, 1991).
[??] Barbara Imber, Lima, Ohio [??] Barbara Jagoe, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
In A Teacher's Guide to Education Law: Third Edition, the authors Imber and Van Geel have added to their previous editions more of the topics of greater importance to present-day schools.
It is a long way from the Metropolitan Police ground at Imber Court to the Stade de France in Paris.
If 31-year-old Farrell's debut goes according to plan for Saracens' Guinness A League side against Harlequins at Imber Court, Esher this evening, then he could make his Premiership debut against Newcastle next Sunday.
By Colin Imber. (New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.