imagination

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imagination

[imaj′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, imaginare, picture to oneself
1 the ability to form, or the act or process of forming, mental images or conscious concepts of things that are not immediately available to the senses.
2 (in psychology) the ability to reproduce images or ideas stored in the memory by the stimulation or suggestion of associated ideas or to regroup former ideas and concepts to form new images and ideas concerned with a particular goal or problem. See also fantasy.

imagination

[L. imago, likeness]
The formation of mental images of things, persons, or situations that are wholly or partially different from those previously known or experienced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Who: Imagination, a global leader in multimedia, processor, communication and cloud technologies
Critique: Informed and informative, thoughtful and thought-provoking, as exceptionally well written as it is insightful, "The Surprising Imagination of C.
A new approach to ecological education: Engaging student's imaginations in their world.
Imagination is defined as "the ability to form new images and sensations in the mind that are not perceived through senses such as sight, hearing, or other senses" (Wikipedia).
Each Einstein in a Box gives children the opportunity to engage their imaginations, apply critical thinking, and most importantly, have fun while learning.
Teaching and Learning Outside the Box: Inspiring Imagination Across the Curriculum
The stress of chronic illness spontaneously jolts children's imaginations, says cultural psychologist Cindy Dell Clark of Pennsylvania State University in Media.
My goal in both places has been to challenge students to rethink their assumptions about nature and their relations to it, their "environmental imaginations.
Why is it important for us, our school, our communities, and out countries to foster children's imaginations and creativity?
We should let our imaginations loose, which will open up both ourselves and our people to the experience of the living Word and the living Christ.
Instead of words and images, smudges, erasures, chance drippings, scribbles, tangled and incomplete forms, contrasts of shadow and light tease our imaginations.