illusory correlation

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illusory correlation

An error in diagnostic thinking in which there is a tendency to assume that two events occurring in the same place or time must be related to each other or be caused by the same phenomenon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stroessner and Plaks (2001) reviewed research suggesting that illusory correlations are most likely to be perceived when people have the motivation and cognitive capacity to process social information with a moderate degree of thoroughness.
instructions urging participants to process information very carefully--Pryor, 1986) have been found to attenuate illusory correlations.
The ACS was administered to participants in this study, and we predicted that illusory correlations would be enhanced and most in evidence among those with moderate (relative to other participants) levels of AC.
The causes of the denigration and social exclusion of people with mental illness are complex and multilayered, but the current research explored illusory correlations as a potential contributor to mental illness stigma.
Thus, in some conditions of our experiment, we examined the readiness of people to form illusory correlations between people with mental illness and violent behavior (as opposed to just negative, undesirable behavior in general).
To test the hypothesized relationship between AC and distinctiveness-based illusory correlations (i.
However, we have demonstrated that illusory correlations and stereotypes are also dependent upon the interpretation of the experimental task.
These findings are consistent with other research suggesting that the absence of illusory correlation can be associated with just as much error as significant illusory correlations (McGarty & de la Haye, 1997).
The tricky nature of skewed frequency tables: An information loss account of distinctiveness-based illusory correlations.
The term illusory correlation refers to the perception of covariation between two classes of events that are uncorrelated (or less strongly correlated than perceived).
Hamilton & Gifford (1976; Study 1) developed the now familiar paradigm to demonstrate the illusory correlation effect in social perception.
However, a number of studies have identified factors that can weaken the distinctiveness-based illusory correlation effect (Schaller & Maass, 1989; Spears, van der Pligt & Eiser, 1985), or have shown that illusory correlation effects can occur without statistical infrequency of a particular category (Berndsen, Spears & van der Pligt, 1996a; Spears, van der Pligt & Eiser, 1986).